Resources search

Learning leadership development from African cultures : a personal perspective

MALUNGA, Chiku
September 2006

Expand view

This PraxisNote supports the notion that effective leadership development strategies in Africa should be rooted in the rich cultural heritage and indigenous social practices. Crucially, the paper adopts an 'ubuntu' perspective, a world-view built around five interrelated principles: sharing and collective ownership of opportunities, responsibilities and challenges; the importance of people and relationships over things; participatory decision making and leadership; patriotism; and reconciliation as a goal of conflict management. The Note looks in some detail at the implications for leadership development of these principles and briefly discusses lessons learned

Setting standards for youth participation

INTERNATIONAL PLANNED PARENTHOOD FEDERATION
2004

Expand view

This guide is primarily aimed at organisations and programme managers working with youth and children, particularly in the area of sexual and reproductive health. Section 1 looks at principles of youth participation in decision making and discusses some of the obstacles preventing sustainable participatory processes and practices. Section 2 introduces a self-assessment model, including questions around shared values, organisational capacity, selection, recruitment and sustaining of youth participation and roles and responsibilities. Section 3 looks at action plan and plan implementation issues. Includes lessons learned and case studies

Institutionalising participation and people-centred processes in natural resource management : research and publications highlights

PIMBERT, Michel
Ed
2004

Expand view

This report presents the background and rationale for the IIED-IDS action research on institutionalising participatory approaches and people centered processes in natural resource management. The methodologies used in the different case studies (India, Indonesia, Senegal, Mexico and other settings) are then introduced, along with the complementary studies undertaken in this collaborative research programme. The last section of this report contains highlights of all the publications in the Institutionalising Participation Series, and a summary of each

Health in poverty reduction strategy : Bangladesh perspective

SIDDIQUI, A M A H
December 2003

Expand view

Case study analyses whether Poverty Reduction Programs (PRSPs) are delivering for health. Case study describes obstacles faced by the poor in accessing health services. Paper advocates a need for bottom up process with more involvement of the poor in policy formulation and implementation

Learning to share learning : an exploration of methods to improve and share learning

CHETLEY, Andrew
VINCENT, Robin
March 2003

Expand view

This is a report, commissioned by the UK Commission for Health Improvement (CHI) in March 2003, which provides a literature review looking at the sharing of learning in different sectors. A key aim of CHI’s approach is to encourage NHS organisations to embed learning in their work to help them improve their practice. The report draws on studies in the fields of education, psychology, organisational learning, personal learning, and participatory approaches to explore understanding of good learning practice. It includes more than 15 case studies that illustrate methodologies and approaches used to share learning in the business, public, and voluntary sectors, paying particular attention to the types of processes that encourage engagement with diverse communities of interest or multiple stakeholders

A participatory approach in practice : understanding fieldworkers' use of participation rural appraisal in ActionAid The Gambia

HOLMES, Tim
June 2001

Expand view

This paper uses a case study to argue that participatory approaches emerge from a complex process of negotiation where fieldworkers are subject to unique combinations of competing influences from the organisations they work for, the communities they work with, and their own personal characteristics. It suggests that fieldworkers can actively pursue personal agendas and can also be involved in changing the structures that condition their actions. However, the paper concludes that elements of the organisational structure can leave little room for fieldworkers to use their agency positively, and that managers need to address this in order to reduce the gap between the policy and practice of participatory approaches

Comprehensive participatory planning and evaluation

LEFEVRE, Pierre
et al
December 2000

Expand view

This publication aims to assist individuals and organisations in planning and evaluating interventions in a flexible, comprehensive and participatory manner. Comprehensive participatory planning and evaluation (CPPE) makes use of both casual and dynamic models and offers a high degree of participation, with increased sense of self-esteem and ownership. It is implementation-orientated and can be applied to a number of situations, including programmes and projects. This guide is clearly written, and the CPPE approach is effectively illustrated in simple steps. Covers a range of topics, including problem assessment, intervention identification, planning, setting up a monitoring and evaluation system and proposal writing. The annexes contain two case studies, practical suggestions for planning workshops and a useful checklist

Worker-led participatory research and evaluation : lessons from the real world : reflections of the SREPP participants

ECKMAN, A
MCQUISTON, T
LIPPON, T
2000

Expand view

In 1997, four US union health and safety training programmes entered into a three-year, multi-union learning action-research collaborative, the Self-sufficiency Research and Evaluation Pilot Project (SREPP). This initiative sought to build the research and evaluation capacities of the participating unions' training by offering a new model of participatory learning and action in the area of worker health and safety. Existing examples of participatory action research in this field have tended to concentrate on single worksites and start with a stakeholder labour management model. By contrast, this project has sought to foster participatory learning across programmes from a union perspective. It uses and expands on the peer-training model to institutionalise a new base of worker produced knowledge. During the last of SREPP’s four training workshops participants reflected on their experiences in the project through a series of participatory activities. In this article the background to the project is followed by the words of SREPP participants describing what it takes to learn about and do participatory evaluation in the context of union-based, worker-led health and safety training programmes. This includes a look at what was learned and how, as well as supports and barriers to participatory evaluation and the model that they have developed

Knowledge shared : participatory evaluation in development cooperation

JACKSON, Edward T
KASSAM, Yusang
Eds
1998

Expand view

This book presents leading-edge analysis on the theory and practice of participatory evaluation around the world. With its instructive case studies from Bangladesh, El Salvador, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nepal, and St Vincent, the book is a guide to a community-based approach to evaluation that is at once a learning process, a means of taking action, and a catalyst for empowerment. It is intended primarily as a tool for practitioners and policymakers in all segments of development cooperation, but will equally appeal to students, professors, scholars, and researchers in development studies, development administration, evaluation, environmental studies, social work, community development, rural development, international public health, and other disciplines related to sustainable and equitable development

Participatory design and monitoring of reproductive health projects

HAWKINS, Kirstan
March 1996

Expand view

This document aims to find an effective way of designing and implementing programmes that address sexual and reproductive health needs by placing beneficiary perspectives in a central position. The document is split into two main sections. Section A provides a brief guide to designing a participatory monitoring system. Participatory monitoring as used in this document refers mainly to the inclusion of ‘primary stakeholders’ in monitoring of project activities. Moreover, there is a discussion of how impact can be measured from the users' perspectives through the use of proxy indicators. A checklist of key questions to be asked is provided as a guide to enhancing participation at the different stages of the project cycle which is followed by a brief comparison of external review monitoring versus monitoring. To illustrate the process of including client monitoring within the logical framework of a project, a case study example of the design of participatory monitoring is provided. The illustration ends with a discussion of the data collection systems that were used. Section B under the heading 'Resource materials' is divided into four sections which greatly overlap with the issues raised in Section A. The four sections cover the following areas in detail I) a detailed checklist for incorporating users' perspective in the project cycle, ii) different methods for monitoring from the users' perspective, iii) an overview of conventional family planning indicators and iv) a brief review of the literature on sexual and reproductive health. The paper briefly concludes with repeated calls for the user perspective to form the cornerstone of project design and monitoring

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates