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Getting the message across : the mass media and the response to AIDS

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
December 2005

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The mass media have the potential to provide a platform for discussion, communication and education on HIV and AIDS, giving a voice to people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA), challenging stigma and discrimination, lobbying policy makers and building partnerships and capacity through sharing and transferring skills and expertise. However, mass media can also disseminate misleading messages, while HIV/AIDS communication competes with other topics for broadcasting time and audiences. This report presents three case studies of effective and creative use of the media in South Africa: Soul City and Soul Buddyz adopt an 'edutainment' approach, aiming both to educate and entertain; the Community Health Media Trust produces a series of programmes addressing issues concerning people with HIV/AIDS; Takalani makes television and radio programmes, to encourage small children to develop self-esteem, offer positive models and destigmatise PLWHA. Detailing the lessons learned from these experiences, the report looks at how target audiences are chosen, how partnerships are formed, how topics and ideas are developed and what ethical issues arise

Opportunities to scale up participatory approaches for youth and media

CHETLEY, Andrew
March 2004

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This paper looks at a different way to scale up participatory approaches, in particular a method that involves participatory communication. It considers how communication, participation, networking, diversity and association relate to the issue of scaling up. It gives examples of participatory approaches to communication which have worked when scaled up, along with the key lessons and principles that can be extracted

Moving forward : a report on pioneering responses to children affected by HIV/AIDS in Andhra Pradesh, India

VASAVYA MAHILA MANDALI (VMM)
March 2004

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Since 2000, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and its country office in India has worked in three states in India to establish and support three Lead Partners, including Vasavya Mahila Mandali (VMM), and 37 implementing NGOs to carry out a pioneering programme of home and community-based care and support for children affected by HIV/AIDS and their families. In this report, VMM draws on its work to identify gaps in existing services and propose effective initiatives, policies and examples of good practice for dealing with the issues that children face when they are affected by HIV/AIDS

Stepping back from the edge : the pursuit of antiretroviral therapy in Botswana, South Africa and Uganda

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2004

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This report looks at what is being done to challenge the pace of progress on access to antiretroviral medicines in three very different African countries - Botswana, South Africa and Uganda. It describes who is driving these initiatives at grass-roots level and how. It offers insights and draws on lessons from firsthand experiences that can help those already working towards better access to antiretrovirals, and encourages others to embark on similar initiatives. It is intended for all those with an interest in this issue, from policy- and decision-makers with the power to create a favourable environment for antiretroviral treatment, to those working on the front line in health services, NGOs and AIDS service organizations, as well as those living with HIV, whose role in the battle for wider access is vital

A family is for a lifetime

WILLIAMSON, Jan
December 2003

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A discussion on the need for family care for children living in HIV/AIDS affected communities followed by an annotated bibliography. This pulls together the best research and experience from practice to provide important guidance to responses at family levels. Community based responses are difficult to define and this identifies the need to find a consensus so as to provide a way forward for action. The discussion in the paper is a review of 80 documents about the provision of care for children lacking family care in countries affected by HIV/AIDS

A comparative study of after action review (AAR) in the context of the southern Africa crisis : a case study paper for the Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action

SEXTON, Richard
MCCONNAN, Isobel
June 2003

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After Action Review (AAR) is a review technique for appraising ongoing or past operational activity. Part One of this paper identifies the principal components of an AAR-type process and explains how AAR works. It also contains a section on the assumptions underpinning the methodology used for this study. Parts Two, Three and Four each describe the experience of an individual agency or event. Part Five explores the comparative dimensions of the case studies, and lessons learned are described in an Annex

Learning to share learning : an exploration of methods to improve and share learning

CHETLEY, Andrew
VINCENT, Robin
March 2003

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This is a report, commissioned by the UK Commission for Health Improvement (CHI) in March 2003, which provides a literature review looking at the sharing of learning in different sectors. A key aim of CHI’s approach is to encourage NHS organisations to embed learning in their work to help them improve their practice. The report draws on studies in the fields of education, psychology, organisational learning, personal learning, and participatory approaches to explore understanding of good learning practice. It includes more than 15 case studies that illustrate methodologies and approaches used to share learning in the business, public, and voluntary sectors, paying particular attention to the types of processes that encourage engagement with diverse communities of interest or multiple stakeholders

ICTs for development success stories : youth poverty gender

GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE PARTNERSHIP (GKP)
Ed
2003

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This publication highlights initiatives that are using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to make a real and meaningful difference in communities around the world. The aim is to share experiences and lessons learned to increase global understanding of how ICTs can be used to tackle poverty, injustice and inequalities. The stories were submitted to GKP under three broad categories: youth, poverty and gender. The best among them have been selected for the inaugural GKP Youth Award, the Tony Zeitoun Awards for poverty reduction, and the Gender and ICT Awards. The awards were presented at the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in Geneva in December 2003

The compliance service uses SMS technology for TB treatment

BRIDGES.ORG
2003

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A comprehensive case study on the use of the Short Message Service (SMS) to alert tuberculosis (TB) patients to take their medication. The initiative has led to a significant increase in the recovery rate of patients and could lead to savings for healthcare authorities

Gender in perspective

INTERCHURCH ORGANIZATION FOR DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION (ICCO)
2002

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Brochure in which ICCO presents its vision and approach concerning the advancement and emancipation of women. It outlines ICCO's gender policy within the organisation and in its cooperation with partner organisations

Working with young men to promote sexual and reproductive health

RIVERS, Kim
AGGLETON, Peter
January 2002

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Gender is increasingly acknowledged to be central to understanding young people's experiences of sexual relationships and health. This good practice guide sets out: what we know about young men’s experience of sexual health (informed by research done in different regions across the world); different approaches to working with young men (illustrated by case studies of projects in Latin America, Africa and Asia). Policy-makers, practitioners and researchers working to promote young people's sexual health in resource-constrained settings will find this resource particularly useful

Children in residential care and alternatives

MILES, Glenn
STEPHENSON, Paul
January 2001

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Residential Care and Alternatives is based on child development and protection principles. Tearfund is a Christian organisation and the document makes a number of references to Christian scripture and values. It could be a useful tool for helping Christian organisations that provide, or that are considering providing, residential care to explore better care alternatives or improving the quality of residential care

Children with disabilities

MILES, Glenn
STEPHENSON, Paul
ANDERSON, Fiona
2001

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Split into five pull-out sections, this publication sets out the basic principles of Tearfund's Child Development Policy as applies to disability. Includes case studies of programmes with 'questions for reflection' around building relationships, participation, advocacy, parental responsibility and identifying needs and priorities. Attempts to develop the idea of good practice in programming for children with disabilities

Best practices on indigenous knowledge

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATION SCIENCE AND CULTURE ORGANIZATION (UNESCO). Management of Social Transformations Programme (MOST)
NETHERLANDS ORGANIZATION FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Centre for International Research and Advisory Networks (NUFFIC/CIRAN)
Eds
1999

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This publication provides a series of case studies to illustrate how indigenous knowledge (IK) can be used to create sustainable development. It aims to suggest, by example, guidelines for development planning, as the practices described may give policy makers and development practitioners a deeper insight into the ecological and cultural complexity of sustainable development. Includes basic definition of IK and related terms, and indexes by country and theme

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