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Conduct an accessibility audit in low and middle income countries

NOUVELLET, Hugues
June 2014

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This guide aims to assist professionals in conducting an accessibility audit, and is aimed at Handicap International professionals who have responsibility for developing, implementing or analysing accessibility activities. Within the framework of inclusive local development, an accessibility audit is a complex, substantial and technical process to implement involving a large number of different stakeholders, increase time preparation and technical specialised skills for making recommendations to remove barriers. An accessibility audit is a participatory democracy exercise which can be used as the basis to form relationships between stakeholders in a municipality accessibility commission or even a municipality commission for inclusive development, who will have responsibility for suggesting, studying, organising and implementing actions to improve accessibility

The future is inclusive. How to make international development disability-inclusive

KEOGH, Mary
January 2014

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This first publication in our series on disability inclusive development covers key facts and figures on the situation of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities living in lowincome countries and presents the reasons why development and humanitarian actions must be disability-inclusive. •

Chapter 1 introduces the key concepts in disability-inclusive development and reflects also on CBM’s own journey towards disability-inclusive development.

Chapter 2 highlights why the inclusion of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities is important for effective development and humanitarian outcomes.  

Chapter 3 sets out why the human rights of women, men, girls and boys with disabilities are closely associated with development both at home and in international cooperation.

Chapter 4 highlights the key issues which cause barriers to disability-inclusive development, and provides a set of principles, case studies and good practice examples of how it can be achieved.  

Chapter 5 concludes with some key messages and introduces the topics that we will address in future publications in this series.

Double exposure : disability and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa

SWEENEY, Jacinta
2004

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This paper argues that the situation regarding disability and HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa is in need of more attention. People with various disabilities are more exposed to contracting HIV/AIDS: firstly, because they are deprived of their right to HIV/AIDS information; secondly, because disabled women in particular are sexually exploited due to society’s paralleling of disability with worthlessness. Fundamentally, people with disabilities are further exposed to HIV/AIDS because they are socially excluded. The paper uses the social exclusion framework to argue that there is a need to view social exclusion, disability and HIV/AIDS as part of a relationship. It reviews the debate of definitions of disability and presents various scenarios that illustrate the overlap between poverty and disability, the inaccessibility of HIV/AIDS information, education and communication (IEC) and attitudinal discrimination towards disabled people. The response of some key donors, governments and non-governmental organisations to the situation regarding disability and HIV/AIDS is also reviewed. The paper concludes that the social exclusion framework is useful in order to understand the conceptualisation of disability and that this conceptualisation must be adapted to the social model, which removes the onus of disability from the person to society

Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS : looking beyond awareness

WILKINS, Marissa
VASANI, Dolar
2002

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The social and environmental circumstances that lead vulnerable people to have unprotected sex, exposing them to infections, have to be resolved through addressing the causes of poverty, gender discrimination, and the use of sex as a commodity. This book addresses the impact of HIV without prejudice, by taking a human rights stance. It is useful for trainers, programme planners, policy-makers and CBR programmes

Inclusion in education : the participation of disabled learners

LYNCH, James
2001

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This study reviews developments in the theory, policy and practice of inclusive education since the World Conference on 'Education for All' in 1990. It locates the review firmly within a human rights context. The paper concerns all groups that are excluded or deprived of their human right to primary education, but illustrates in particular the efforts made by learners with impairments overcoming barriers of access. The paper highlights some of the major barriers to inclusion and gives examples of how those barriers have been overcome

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