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Towards Inclusion - A guide for organisations and practitioners

VAN EK, Vera
SCHOT, Sander
2017

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This guide is the result of collaboration between Light for the World (LFTW), Mission East (ME), and ICCO Cooperation.

Based on decades of experience of working with the most marginalized and excluded communities, the three organizations cooperated to record their experiences in a publication which can be used in a variety of relief and development contexts. ‘Towards Inclusion’ is designed to be an easy to use reference for organizational and program/project development with a focus on gender responsiveness and disability inclusion.

The guide is made up of three parts:
• the first part guides users through the process of organizational self-assessment to determine readiness to change and identify key steps towards becoming a more inclusive organization.
• the second part introduces the ACAP framework, as a means of improving inclusion in programming via Access, Communication, Attitude and Participation. A range of tools for measuring and improving inclusion at all stages of the project cycle are provided.
• the third part provides guidelines for the people or ‘change facilitators’ who will guide organizations through the process of change towards becoming more inclusive.

The publication can be found at “Towards Inclusion Guide” and the accessible version of the publication can be downloaded. Both are free of charge.

Possibilities for organisation trainings and/or webinars on the practical application of the guide are under consideration. Contact ACAP@gmail.com.

Why do women not use antenatal services in low- and middle-Income countries? a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies

FINLAYSON, Kenneth
DOWNE, Soo
January 2013

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This article aims to inform the development of future antenatal care programmes through a synthesis of findings in all relevant qualitative studies. The findings suggest that there may be a misalignment between current antenatal care provision and the social and cultural context of some women in low and middle income countries
PLoS Med, Vol 10, Issue 1

HIV decline in Zimbabwe due to reductions in risky sex?|Evidence from a comprehensive epidemiological review

GREGSON, Simon
et al
April 2010

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This article presents research which assessed the contributions of rising mortality, falling HIV incidence and sexual behaviour change to the decline in HIV prevalence in Zimbabwe. It comprised of a comprehensive review and secondary analysis of national and local sources on trends in HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, mortality and sexual behaviour in the period 1985 - 2007. The findings provide the first convincing evidence of an HIV decline accelerated by changes in sexual behaviour in a southern African country, nevertheless, in 2007 one in seven adults in Zimbabwe was still infected by a life-threatening virus and mortality rates remained at crisis point

A handbook for network support agents and other community workers supporting HIV prevention, care, support and treatment

March 2009

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This manual is intended to help network support agents and other community workers be more effective in disseminating standardised information about HIV and AIDS. It "...emphasises the importance of the acquisition of knowledge, skills and the right attitude needed to identify the psychosocial needs of people of people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS and address these needs by giving information, counselling and appropriate referrals. Knowledge of counselling and psychosocial care, is combined as much as possible with prevention activities such as adopting HIV basic care positive prevention and adherence to treatment"

Preventing HIV/AIDS among persons with disabilities : a handbook for policy makers, healthcare providers and care givers of people with disabilities

IVOM, Damian O
2009

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This handbook highlights the factors responsible for the spread of HIV, methods of preventing it within persons with disabilities and how they can be reached and integrated into HIV and AIDS programmes and activities, so as to cause a reduction within its communities and in the general population. It is premised on the fact that many programmes and activities on HIV and AIDS in developing countries especially Sub-Saharan Africa have not realised the need to include persons with disabilities

PMI communication and social mobilization guidelines

PRESIDENT'S MALARIA INITIATIVE (PMI)
2008

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These guidelines are help in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programmes to influence behaviours and mobilise communities to create long-term normative shifts towards desired behaviours and to sustain enabling behaviours around the four interventions of the Presidents Malaria Initiative. These are: * Increased demand for malaria services and products; * Acceptance of indoor residual spraying; * Improved adherence to treatment regimens and intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy during pregnancy; * Regular insecticide-treated nets use by the general population, focusing on vulnerable groups including pregnant women and children under five; * Prompt, appropriate treatment with Artemisinin-based combination therapies for children under five within 24 hours of onset of symptoms; and * Community involvement in malaria control

UNAIDS expert consultation on behaviour change in the prevention of sexual transmission of HIV : highlights and recommendations

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2007

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This is the report of a two-day meeting to consider the state of knowledge around behaviour change measures for the prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV. Participants identified four priority issues around this: prevention measures that are effective in concentrated epidemics; analysis of and responses to sexual behaviour involving multiple concurrent partners and other hyperendemic scenarios; gender inequality, inter-generational sex and gender-based violence as major sources of vulnerablity to women and girls in hyperendemic scenarios; and HIV-related stigma and denial as barriers to behaviour change. Analyses of these issues produced a number of recommendations

Learning from capacity building practice : adapting the 'Most Significant Change' (MSC) approach to evaluate capacity building provision by CABUNGO in Malawi

WRIGLEY, Rebecca
December 2006

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This paper presents the findings of an evaluation initiative of the capacity building services provided by CABUNGO, a local capacity building support provider in Malawi. Using the Most Significant Change approach - a story-based, qualitative and participatory methodology - this pilot exercise attempted to capture the changes resulting from capacity building and to enhance the learning and performance of CABUNGO. Organisational capacity development activities facilitated shifts in knowledge and practices but also in relationships and power dynamics. The paper also highlights advantages and constraints of the MSC approach

Young children, HIV/AIDS and gender : a summary review

BHANA, Deevia
BRIXEN, Farhana Farook
2006

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(From forward) Studies point to the existence of a global HIV/AIDS emergency among young people. An estimated 6,000 youths a day become infected, an average of one new infection every 14 seconds. The most socially and economically disadvantaged young people appear to be especially at risk of infection, and young women in developing contexts are at the greatest risk. The rate of HIV infection among girls is rapidly outstripping the rate among boys. Girls already account for nearly 60 percent of the infections in sub-Saharan Africa, where the pandemic is most virulent. This paper adopts the hypothesis that this pandemic can be confronted already in early childhood. During the first eight years of life the foundations are set for the capacities, beliefs and attitudes that support individuals in later life. In early childhood, people can therefore more easily learn and integrate appropriate risk avoidance behaviours that may prove useful in the global war on HIV/AIDS. The earliest years may represent a window of opportunity for the successful implementation of HIV/AIDS reduction and prevention programmes

Community conversations : empowering community action on HIV/AIDS

CHAAVA, Thebisa
DIOUF, Daouda
Eds
2006

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This is the recording of a session on Community Conversations methodology presented at the XVI International AIDS Conference in Toronto. [From rapporteur report - IAS] This skills-building session was intended to reinforce the capacity within individuals and communities to better understand the nature of epidermic, to reflect on individual experiences and to initiate changes to respond effectively. It also highlighted ways in which lesson learned from one project can be transferred to another community. Diouda Siouf from Senegal shared on the importance of finding ways in which people can work in the community effectively. These included being sensitive to the community, use of facilitation approach rather than intervention by experts, mutual learning and inclusion of all community members in the project cycle. It was noted that use of community conversation mostly does not require funds. The use of community conversation in Cambodia has helped in educating the community in different issues such as HIV/AIDS. The session was experiential and participatory and worked through a "community conversation" exercise. It was extremely emotional since the participants had to share their own experiences and views of HIV in the role plays during the session

Planning behaviour change communication (BCC) interventions : a practical handbook

CHEN, Peter F.
2006

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This handbook begins by clarifing the concepts of behaviour change communication (BCC) interventions in the context of UNFPA programmes. This is followed by a brief presentation of some of the most common theoretical frameworks that serve to help gain an understanding of the processes that can influence health-related behaviours. An important aspect of the handbook is the step-by-step guide on following a process or chain of events to plan, design, execute, monitor and evaluate BCC interventions

Yaari dosti : Young men redefine masculinity, a training manual

POPULATION COUNCIL
2006

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This manual was adapted from the Brazilian Program H curriculum and piloted in urban slum communities in India as part of an operations research study aimed at reducing HIV risk among young men by addressing perceptions of gender norms. The manual can be used by health educators, teachers and/or other professionals or volunteers who want to work, or are already working, with young men between 15 and 24 years old. It is divided into four subsections: gender, sexuality and reproductive health, violence, and preventing and living with HIV & AIDS, around each of which there is a series of activities

networklearning.org

NETWORK LEARNING
December 2005

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This website aims to make high quality manuals, field books and training courses easily available to groups who need them (free of cost to those in the South but with a contribution of $25 requested from those in the North); to encourage colleagues to be open to new knowledge and skills, to plan and stick to self-guided learning; to introduce topics which may be new to some people an to link users to resources, useful organisations, websites and materials; and to provide a place for users working in different countries in the South to stay informed. The resources are available online and cover a variety of topics in a clear, easy to understand format. It provides a number of guidelines including guidelines for writing reports [http://www.networklearning.org/writing-reports.html] and a simple guide to the web [http://www.networklearning.org/web.html]

Counting on communication : the Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project

VERZOSA, Cecilia
April 2005

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This publication presents the activities and lessons learned from a project which sought to halve malnutrition among preschool children, raise primary school enrollment, reduce dropout and repetition rates, improve psycho-social and cognitive development, and increase the number of mothers practicing appropriate childcare. A strategic communication programme was designed to help mothers and other caregivers adopt new behaviours needed to achieve project outcomes. It helped the project team identify necessary changes in behaviour, knowledge or attitude for all target audiences; frame project-related issues relevant to different stakeholders, such as parliamentarians, mothers, community leaders, educators, and local government administrators; craft persuasive messages according to their needs, concerns and perceptions; and use the most appropriate communication channels. The communication strategy included a: national advocacy effort aimed at parliamentarians, health and education ministry officials, district and community leaders; multi-media campaign that emphasized three behaviour change interventions; training programme for health workers and pre-school teachers on their role; and monitoring and evaluation component to ensure that materials were disseminated via cost-effective channels of communication and that messages reached target audiences. Lessons learned emphasize the value of developing a comprehensive communication strategy during project design.

Maternal survival : improving access to skilled care. A behavior change approach

CHANGE
February 2005

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This summary is based on the CHANGE Maternal Survival Toolkit, available online at: www.changeproject.org and on CD-ROM. It explores ways of influencing behaviours and encouraging use of health services and health professionals during childbirth and the postpartum period. A number of factors can prevent pregnant women from accessing skilled care, often putting themselves and the child at risk. They include availability of health services and high costs but also, and crucially, local culture, family and community behaviours and traditional practices. The CHANGE Project's approach and this document stress locally appropriate, behaviour-based interventions that integrate what is happening in homes, communities and health facilities. This tool is aimed at organisations and individuals working in the field of mother and child health, and willing to look at maternal and child survival issues from a behaviour change perspective

Drug promotion : what we know, what we have yet to learn

NORRIS, Pauline
et al
2005

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This is a literature review on drug promotion, summarising current research findings on: professional and lay people's attitudes toward drug promotion; impact of pharmaceutical promotion on attitudes and knowledge; impact of pharmaceutical promotion on behaviour; and interventions carried out to counter promotional activities. The review suggests that promotion affects attitudes and behaviour. However evidence is patchy and more research is needed to verify the relationship between drug promotion and behaviour change

Hygiene promotion in Burkina Faso and Zimbabwe : new approaches to behaviour change

SIDIBE, Mynam
CURTIS, Val
August 2004

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After years of debate, most people working in water and sanitation now agree that hygiene promotion is vitally important. But even now, many programmes either ignore it or do it badly. This field note describes two African hygiene promotion programmes that have successfully used new approaches: Saniya in burkina Faso and ZimAHEAD in Zimbabwe. Both programmes concentrated on understanding how people actually hehave and hence hot to change that behaviour. Both programmes demonstrated ideas that can be applied at a larger scale. Changin human hygiene behaviour is a long process that is difficult to measure and both of these programmes still have obstacles to overcome. However, this work indicates that systematic and carefully managed hygiene promotion programmes can achieve improvement in hygiene behaviour and hence reduction in diarrhoeal diseases

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