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India inclusion summit 2018

March 2019

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India Inclusion Summit is a community driven initiative that aspires to build an Inclusive India by 2030. It is an annual event that began in 2012 to create awareness about disabilities and the need for Inclusion. The event brings together thought leaders and unsung heroes from the field of disability and inclusion to deliberate, discuss and drive change in our society.

 

Videos of some of the presentations are available including:

My Journey and ‘Deaf gain’ing an accessible India:  Vaibhav Kothari (18 mins), signed

You’re not just special. You’re Special Edition:  SwarnaLatha (11 mins)

Don’t let disability come in the way of things you love: Zoyeb Zia (10 mins), signed

The Adventure of Autism and quest to serve each other: Rupert Isaacson (20 mins), signed

Making a billion people read despite their disabilities: Brij Kothari (21 mins), signed

The ability needed to be whoever you want to be: Devika Malik (13 mins), signed

Everyone has something to give: Suchitra Shenoy (11 mins), signed

From being inclusive to doing acts of inclusion: Yetnebersh Niguissie (12 mins), signed

Finding your missing piece: Jerry White (18 mins), signed

Listening to the voice within that opens infinite possibilities: Rajni Bakshi (15 mins), signed

Being a mother is the most satisfying role: Suhasini Maniratnam (21 mins) signed

 

 

Kazakhstan: Education Barriers for Children with Disabilities

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
March 2019

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The video reports that most children with disabilities in Kazakhstan are not getting a quality, inclusive education and that although the Kazakh government has taken some important steps to better protect the rights of children with disabilities, much more needs to be done to ensure equal access to education for all children.

Cases of children with Downs Syndrome, autism and arthritis are highlighted.

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2019, Vol. 6 No. 1. Special issue: Disability and the decolonial turn: Perspectives from the Americas

2019

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Articles included are:

  • Disability, Decoloniality, and Other-than-Humanist Ethics in Anzaldúan Thought
  • Decolonizing Schools: Women Organizing, Disability Advocacy, and Land in Sāmoa
  • Adapting an Education Program for Parents of Children with Autism from the United States to Colombia
  • Precarious Bodies, Precarious Lives: Framing Disability in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Cinema
     

 

African Journal of Disability Vol 7 (2018) - Special collection: Disability and inclusion in Africa - The role of assistive technology

2018

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This journal provides

  • Nine original research articles on a variety of topics including the cost of raising a child with autism, experiences of care givers to stroke survivors, dyslexic's learning experiences, communication rehabilitation, disability and food security, hearing children of deaf parents and rehabilitation of stroke survivors. 
  • Three review articles: Intellectual disability rights and inclusive citizenship in South Africa: What can a scoping review tell us?; The benefits of hydrotherapy to patients with spinal cord injuries; Simple ideas that work: Celebrating development in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.
  • There is an opinion paper entitled - Deafening silence on a vital issue: The World Health Organization has ignored the sexuality of persons with disabilities
  •  There is a case study - Lessons from the pilot of a mobile application to map assistive technology suppliers in Africa

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Vol 29, No 1 (2018): Spring 2018

2018

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Research papers in this journal issue are:

  1. Anticipated Barriers to Implementation of Community-Based Rehabilitation in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  2. Parental Perceptions, Attitudes and Involvement in Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Sarawak, Malaysia
  3. Utilisation and Satisfaction with Health Services among Persons with Disabilities in Accra, Ghana

 

Brief reports are:

  1. Predictors in the Selection of an AAC system: An Evidence-based Report on Overcoming Challenges
  2. Negotiating Future Uncertainty: Concerns of Mothers of Children with Down Syndrome in Kashmir, India
  3. Competencies of Students with Visual Impairment in using the White Cane in their Learning Environment: a Case Study at Wenchi Senior High in Ghana
  4. Teacher Trainees’ Perceptions of Inclusion of and its Challenges

Online collective identities for autism: The perspective of Brazilian parents

ANTUNES, Debora
DHOEST, Alexander
2018

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This paper aims to better understand the role of social media in the definition and spread of views on autism in Brazil. To do so, it explores the identities adopted by parents of autistic people in one of the biggest Brazilian online communities about the subject on Facebook, ‘Sou autista… conheça o meu mundo’ (I am autistic… get to know my world), whose members are mostly parents, mainly mothers of autistic people

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1, 1273-1291

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2018, Vol. 5 No. 1

2018

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Articles include:

  • Inclusive Education in the global South? A Colombian perspective: ‘When you look towards the past, you see children with disabilities, and if you look towards the future, what you see is diverse learners
  • Services for people with Communication Disabilities in Uganda: supporting a new Speech and Language Therapy profession
  • Health Information-Seeking Behaviour of Visually Impaired Persons in Ibadan Metropolis, Nigeria
  • Online Collective Identities for Autism: The Perspective of Brazilian Parents
  • Transnationalizing Disability Policy in Embedded Cultural-Cognitive Worldviews: the Case of Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Portrayal of Disabled People in the Kuwaiti Media

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Vol 28, No 2 (2017), summer 2017

June 2017

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6 research articles

  • Teachers’ Perceptions of Disabilities on the Island of Roatán, Honduras 
  • Access to Services and Barriers faced by People with Disabilities: A Quantitative Survey
  • Parent Empowerment in Early Intervention Programmes of Children with Hearing Loss in Mumbai, India 
  • Analysis of Bibliography on Specific Learning Disability in India 
  • Positive and Negative Impacts on Caregivers of Children with Intellectual Disability in India 
  • Effect of Multidisciplinary Intervention on Clinical Outcomes of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Mumbai, India 

 

 doi 10.5463

Autism spectrum disorders

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION
April 2017

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This fact sheet provides key facts and an overview about autism spectrum disorders. Associated epidemiology, causes, assessment and management, social and economic impacts are briefly covered. The human rights of people with ASD are discussed and the WHO Resolution on autism spectrum disorders (WHA67.8) is introduced.

Satellite classes: A promising model for educating children and young people on the autism spectrum

CROYDEN, Abigail
et al
2017

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Results of research into attempts to provide the best of both mainstream and specialist education for autistic children are presented. The ‘satellite class’ model of supported inclusion is where the strengths of a special school education are kept in place for selected autistic pupils as they transfer to dedicated classes within mainstream ‘host schools’. The schools studied were all within the London borough of Tower Hamlets, UK.

Autism and eating issues: an interview with Dr Elizabeth Shea

THE NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY
January 2017

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Dr Elizabeth Shea is Clinical Psychologist at the Birmingham Food Refusal Service. Elizabeth kindly agreed to be interviewed for Network Autism when she attended the XI Autism-Europe International Congress hosted by the National Autistic Society in 2016.

In this video Elizabeth discusses some of the common eating issues that autistic people may experience. She explores why autistic people may struggle with eating issues and outlines how professionals can best support them.

Individual interview questions

1. Can you tell us how you first became interested in autism?

2. Can you tell us about your current work?

3. What are the most common eating issues that you see for autistic people?

4. Can you highlight some of the reasons why autistic people may develop eating issues?

5. What are the most effective treatments for eating issues for autistic people?

6. What advice would you have for professionals working with autistic people who maybe struggling with eating issues?

Advances in Autism, vol.3, no.3, 2017 Special issue: Improving access to healthcare

2017

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Special issue: Improving access to healthcare. The aim of this special issue is to stimulate discussion and new research on the health and health care of people with autism spectrum disorder. In a co-productive approach, we give people on the autism spectrum, their families and health care providers a voice to open an exchange between professionals and people with lived experience. The guest editorial is freely accessible. There are six papers:

 

  • Autism and healthcare
  • Quality of health and health services in people with fragile X syndrome: perspective of their parents
  • Transition tools and access to adult primary care
  • Systemic-attachment formulation for families of children with autism
  • An online ASD learning module for pediatric health care professionals
  • Pain in Rett syndrome: peculiarities in pain processing and expression, liability to pain causing disorders and diseases, and specific aspects of pain assessment

The autism employment gap report

September 2016

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For nearly a decade, the full-time employment rate of autistic adults has stagnated. A survey we carried out in 2007 indicated that just 15% of autistic people were in full-time paid work. Shockingly, in this year’s survey, the figure was just 16%.

 

A similar number are in part-time employment, giving an overall employment rate of 32%. And while full-time work won’t be right for everyone on the autism spectrum, four in 10 of those working part-time feel under-employed. Others feel they are in low-skilled work and employers don’t see their abilities. They see their autism. They see a problem.

 

Meanwhile, employers have told us that they are worried about getting things wrong for autistic employees and that they don’t know where to go for advice. Autistic people are overloaded by too much information at work, and employers don’t have enough.

 

The UK Government has made a very welcome pledge to halve the disability employment gap by the end of this Parliament, meaning that they have to shift the disability employment rate from 47% to 64%. But the autism employment gap is even wider. For the number of autistic people in work to reach 64%, the Government will need to commit to doubling the number of autistic people in employment by 2020.

 

Both Government and employers need to take specific action to make this happen – without it, recent history tells us that autistic people will continue to be left behind

Help loved ones with sensory overload enjoy shopping

Retail Me Not
2016

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About 5 percent of the population is estimated to suffer from some form of sensory processing disorder. Considering that everyone needs to shop at some point, there are tremendous numbers of people out and about on a daily basis who are struggling to cope with sensory overload.

Sensory overload can hit adults as well as children. This guide is to help children and adults who may be susceptible to sensory overload in malls, shopping centers and other stores.

Living in fear: experiences of hate crime and discrimination amongst people with learning disabilities and autism

BRADSHAW, Jill
RICHARDSON, Lisa
May 2016

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The views and experiences of people with learning disabilities and autism living within one UK unitary authority (Medway, Kent) were explored.  Aspects investigated were: how many people victimisation affects; who is affected by victimisation; what type of things happen to them; and the impact of victimisation on their quality of life.  The focus groups were: 7 groups with people with intellectual disability and autism (31 people); 4 groups with family and paid carers (33 people).  A survey was completed by: people with intellectual disabilities and autism (220 surveys) and family or paid carers (35 surveys).  27 individual interviews were carried out. 

Best Practice Guides for professional supporting autistic students in Higher education. Guide 1: Best practice for HEI managers and senior academics

FABRI, Marc
ANDREWS, Penny
PUKKI, Heta
March 2016

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This guide is for managers and senior academics at universities and higher education institutions, to provide with information and evidence to help develop policies and practices that will benefit autistic students and improve the student experience. It was developed from work in five European countries. It is one of three guides to help higher education professionals support autistic students.

Best Practice Guides for professionals supporting autistic students in Higher Education. Guide 3: For professionals supporting autistic students within or outside HE Institutions

FABRI, Marc
ANDREWS, Penny
PUKI, Heta
March 2016

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This guide is for specialists directly supporting autistic students. This may be as part of a disability support team within a Higher Education Institution (HEI), or for an independent organisation that provides services to HE. Insights from research and from good practice across Europe are shared to help improve student experiences and engagement with information and services, and to develop expertise.

Online resource for parents and carers of children with autism

SIVARAMAKRISHNAN, Shobha
March 2015

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An information resource for the parents, carers and any other health professionals involved in the welfare of children on the autism spectrum. Within this document, it is outlined what is meant by the term 'autism', possible signs to look for in assessing and diagnosing a condition on the spectrum, associated physical or mental impairments which can be associated with a condition on the spectrum, and finally how a healthcare or other relevant professional (eg. education) may be best able to manage the condition in a variety of conditions

Note: The user has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Violence against children with ASD and risks of unintentional violent behaviours : epidemiology and characteristics

VISCI, Giovanni
2015

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“This report is the first part of the action research carried out within the Speak Up project. It presents the research results in the field of epidemiology, as well as the characteristics of children and young people with ASD [Autistic Spectrum Disorder] as victims of abuse or as unintentional perpetrators. This survey was carried out transnationally. Each of the partners involved in the project provided sample cases involving children with ASD as victims of abuse, as well as sample cases involving children and young people with ASD as unintentional perpetrators of violence. The research aims at researching the correlations between violence and the characteristics of autism, and the correlations between forms of maltreatment and their corresponding causes”. The sample size was 70

 

Research part I : survey on the Epidemiology and characteristics of population of investigated children victims or unintentionally perpetrators

 

SPEAK UP project : system for protection and empowerment of autistic child as victim of abuse or unintentional perpetrator (Just/2012/DAP/AG/3192)

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