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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Mobile for development : transforming global healthcare through mobile technology

THEVATHASAN, Vanessa
GRADZEWICZ, Agnes
RUETZEL, Sonja
2015

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This paper outlines the need for greater connectivity & accessibility in less developed countries. Following this, the authors present the benefits of various different ‘mHealth’ solutions, presented through case studies. The report concludes by outlining some of the constraints holding back greater ‘mHealth’ innovation, including financing and sustainability issues

Web accessibility policy making : an international perspective

G3ICT
THE CENTRE FOR INTERNET AND SOCIETY
January 2012

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This report reviews of a number of countries policies on web accessibility to share good practice. The internet and ICT have become increasingly accessible with the introduction of electronic screen readers, close-captions video viewers and personally tailored assistive technology readers. Despite this, the authors maintain that there are still 1 billion disabled people who could have better access to the internet and ICT and there is great potential for improvement

Accomplishments and challenges of a community based rehabilitation initiative in Honduras

April 2006

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This article outlines key elements, success stories and critical aspects of the community-based rehabilitation programme led by the Instituto Psicopedagógico Juana Leclerc, Honduras. It emphasises the need to integrate technical/therapeutic and social responses to provide adequate rehabilitation opportunities, with more physiotherapy services and properly designed standardised equipment. In particular, it considers common problems with children's wheelchairs and suggests design modifications

Disability and inclusive development [whole issue]

July 2005

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This issue of Development Outreach, a magazine published by the World Bank, is dedicated to disability and inclusive development. Articles highlight the links between disability and equity, poverty and gender issues, HIV and AIDS, and broadcast media; disability at policy level in USAID, DFID and the United Nations; and several case studies of projects that aim to empower people with disabilities, socially, economically and politically

Up-scaling pro-poor ICT policies and practices

GERSTER, Richard
ZIMMERMANN, Sonja
February 2005

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This paper is the result of a literature review and discussions during a two-day workshop. It examines how ICT can make a difference in reducing poverty and reaching the MDGs. This potential contrasts, however, with the relatively modest pro-poor ICT implementation level. It asks what key barriers impede the implementation of declarations, and how can we multiply, upscale and replicate successful pilot projects. This study idenfies four "basic requirements" for successful up-scaling of poverty reduction through ICTs: an enabling ICT policy environment; a high priority assigned to ICT for poverty reduction; appropriate technology choices; and mobilisation of additional public and private resources

Liverpool school of tropical medicine : Malaria knowledge programme. Annual report 2003-2004 : reduction in the suffering by improving the management of malaria through better intervention and control of malaria.’

LIVERPOOL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE (LSTM)
2004

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The report shows the overall activities of the Malaria Knowledge Programme during 2003-2004. It initially outlines the research activities and the new knowledge outputs. Using a framework developed by Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine's Vulnerability and Health Alliance the report contains an evaluation of the implications and effects of the research findings on those most vulnerable to the effects of malaria

Information and communications technology : web sites, CD-ROMs, and on-line educational projects hold promise for youth|[Tecnología de información y comunicación. Sitios web, CD-ROM y proyectos educacionales en la web prometedores para los jóvenes]

BLOOME, Anthony
ZWICKER, Caroline
FINGER, William
September 2003

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Technology resources increasingly link professionals working with reproductive health and HIV prevention programmes in developing countries. These same resources (websites, CD-ROMS, listservs, radio and TV) offer great promise for reaching the youth as well. This edition of Youth Lens looks at some of the projects working in these areas

Evaluation and utilization of traditional methods of communication in Cameroon's central, southern, eastern and extreme northern regions : case study 20

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO). Communication for Development Group
August 2003

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This study's main objectives are to evaluate traditional means of communication; to note their constraints; to select the traditional methods which can best be used for the diffusion of information and to devise a strategy for implementing the selected method of traditional communication. The methodology of this survey is based on the Active Method of Participative Research.
The study illustrates that the traditional media for communication in Cameroon are: the gong and songs accompanied by dances (in all of the surveyed provinces); the xylophone (in the center and south); griot [travelling poet] and balafon (in the east); colleagues of the traditional chiefs (Lawanes, Djaoros); and messengers of traditional chiefs or muezzins (extreme north).There are numerous constraints to using individuals in devising communications strategies: a lack of trained musicians, the lack of initiative on the part of the village elders, the disinterest of the youth, conflict among the different generations, the proliferation of modern communications technologies, the complexity of training in various methods, the possible alteration of messages, a lack of motivation and the slow speed of transmission. The study notes that the best methods for the diffusion of information in the regions surveyed in Cameroon are: the gong, the colleagues and messengers of traditional chiefs to organize village meetings in which reproductive health issues could be raised, singing and dancing, travelling poets and xylophones.
In order to devise effective strategies for conveying messages about reproductive health through these traditional methods of communication, traditional authorities must be engaged early on in the process and informed of the importance of these means of communication; qualified individuals must be identified as resources and others trained; and a training of trainers must be conducted

Community Eye Health : an international journal to promote eye health worldwide : issues 25-42 1998-2002

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EYE HEALTH
2003

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This CD-ROM contains back issues of the Journal of Community Eye Health, a continuing education resource for eye health workers in developing countries. Each issue has an editorial, review articles and updates on a specific theme as well as reports, abstracts, letters and reviews on other themes. The Journal supports the WHO-led Vision 2020 programme through the dissemination of up-to-date information about the priority diseases and strategies identified by Vision 2020. Back issues are also available through the ICEH website

A dialogue on ICTs and poverty : the Harvard Forum

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
2003

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In September 2003, 30 experts from around the world gathered at Harvard University to discuss how ICTs can help to reduce poverty. These multimedia files give a brief survey of their discussions, concerns and conclusions

Revisiting the "magic box" : case studies in local appropriation of information and communication technologies (ICTs)

BATCHELOR, Simon
O’FARRELL, Clare
2003

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This book looks at the way communities and groups in developing countries are appropriating information and communication technologies (ICTs) to address their needs. It finds that ICTs are being integrated into wider community-based activities and adapted to fit different contexts. It follows on from the paper "Discovering the Magic Box". It finds that there are still few examples of community-driven and locally appropriated ICT initiatives and an absence of standards or guidelines to evaluate ICT-based projects. The book includes some analytical frameworks and indicators to identify good practice and evidence of impact A significant development has been in the growth of telecommunications, in particular mobile phones, that are relatively cheap and powerful tools for poor communities, even in remote areas. The book concludes that the power of oral communication through telephones and radio cannot be underestimated. The book proposes that the main challenge is to adapt the new, usually computer-based ICTs to the needs of poor, predominantly oral-based communities so that they can be appropriated effectively and quickly

A challenge to make more effective use of scarce resources | Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine : annual report 2002-2003

LSTM
2003

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This page contain information on the Malaria Knowledge Programme at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. The page notes the work carried out by the VHA on developing a framework that can be used to identify cross-sectoral and multi-disciplinary approaches to vulnerability to malaria, TB and HIV. It shows that few resources are being put into developing appropriate, cheap and accurate tools for malaria diagnosis. Evidence shows that what is needed is effective district laboratory services. It also mentions the Gates Malaria Partnership, which has supported a radio project in the Gambia. It is called ‘Bolonghodala’ which means ‘By the Riverside’. It is a radio drama set in a fictional but typical rural village and combines stories about people’s lives with malaria prevention

Livelihoods approaches to information and communication in support of rural poverty elimination and food security

CHAPMAN, Robert
SLAYMAKER, Tom
YOUNG, John
2003

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FAO, DFID and ODI undertook a study in 2001/2 to analyse the role of information in livelihoods, and make recommendations on how agencies can capitalise on and integrate the best elements of traditional communication methods and new information and communication (ICT) technologies within the livelihoods approach. This publication provides the results of the initial literature review, comprised of a 30 page paper followed by 20 pages of heavily annotated references. The key conclusions were that information and communications systems are most likely to improve livelihoods in rural areas if they: share costs appropriately; ensure equitable access to all; contain a high proportion of local or appropriately localised content; build on existing systems; build capacity; use realistic technologies; and build knowledge partnerships

Meeting the HIV/AIDS challenge to food secutiry : the role of labour saving technologies in farm-households

DU GUERNAY, Jacques
December 2002

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The paper focuses on the various types and levels of constraints faced by farm-households as a production and reproduction system within a farming system. These constraints include time and energy limitations created by HIV/AIDS provoked shortages. The paper highlights the contributions various labour saving technologies (LSTs) could provide while also stressing the conditions, including gender ones, which have to be met in order to introduce LSTs successfully. LSTs are a partial solution to HIV/AIDS problems, but also represent a challenge to the way agriculture is practiced and to common policies in both agriculture and HIV/AIDS. The focus on LSTs is a fertile field for cooperation between sectors, between public and private institutions, North-South and South-South

Strengthening local capacities to create and adapt healthcare information

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
October 2002

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The key messages of this report centre around the current global information explosion and its limited impact on access to relevant, practical information for healthcare providers in developing countries, who continue to lack access to the basic information they need. Relevance and reliability are paramount in meeting health information needs. Local 'health information providers' (publishers, libraries, NGOs, Ministries of Health) are best placed to provide content for local 'end users'. The effectiveness of the international 'health information community' is dependent on its ability to facilitate the expression of local knowledge and experience, and to promote dialogue and exchange among local providers and end users. Local producers and end users must be involved from the earliest stages in dialogue, priority-setting, problem-solving, creative thinking, and generation of plans for action. Creation and adaptation of local content requires access to a wide range of existing source materials, both internationally and nationally. Creation and adaptation of local content is resource-intensive and requires the full range of skills, including medical knowledge, knowledge of end-users needs, and writing and editorial skills. Traditional knowledge and 'scientific' knowledge are mutually reinforcing and can be combined in ways that enhance the quality and coverage of healthcare in developing countries. ICTs present new opportunities to enhance the above processes

Towards equity in global health knowledge

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
PRIESTLY, Carol
July 2002

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Emphasizes the interdependence of global health knowledge and draw attention to inequities in the global flow of information that profoundly affect the evolution of the global knowledge base and its relevance to health priorities. Information and communication technologies have great potential to reduce these inequities, not only by disseminating information, but also by supporting such important activities as international co-operation and Southern-led development. Describes briefly some of the challenges, recent achievements, and priorities for the future

Collecting and propagating local development content : synthesis and conclusions

BALLANTYNE, Peter
May 2002

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Drawing from a consultation process to examine how local content in developing countries is created, adapted, and exchanged, this report provides some answers to these questions. It is a synthesis of lessons; the case stories which are reproduced in an accompanying report provide details on actual experienses and lessons from the ground

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