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Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

The challenge of HIV : social stigma or disability?

MCTIGUE, Peter
November 2010

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"The nature of discrimination against people living with HIV and with AIDS ('PLHA') is rooted in deeper stigmatisation than discrimination against other groups. Reasons for this include the association of HIV/AIDS with behaviours that may be considered socially unacceptable by many people. To combat such discrimination, HIV is deemed to be a 'disability' under the Equality Act 2010. Whilst this protection has been welcomed by various activists and policy groups within the field, it will be argued that the decision to classify HIV as a disability is an inadequate response to the unique and multi-faceted discrimination faced by PLHA. To achieve this this article will examine the history of the virus; current epidemiology within the UK; the extent to which HIV accords with traditional models of disability and the definition employed by the Equality Act 2010; and finally, the manner in which HIV is socially constructed and how this has compounded discrimination against PLHA"
5 Web JCLI

Stories of love, pain and courage : AIDS orphans and memory boxes

DENIS, Philippe
MAKIWANE, Nokhaya
2003

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This article reports on a project by the Sinomlando Centre for Oral History, in which memory boxes were used with young children in South Africa who had recently lost a parent due to AIDS. The act of making memory boxes and talking about the memories to be stored within it creates a space for families and communities to talk about life, death and plans for the future. This communication creates a psychosocial support network for young children with the aim of promoting resiliency so that they may be better able to cope with their loss. The article includes a short methodology of how the results of the project were gathered and three detailed case studies

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