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Disability, CBR and inclusive development : Volume 28, No.1, Spring 2017

2017

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Titles of research articles in this issue of the journal are:

  • Community Action Research in Disability (CARD): An inclusive research programme in Uganda
  • The Impact of Community-Based Rehabilitation in a Post-Conflict Environment of Sri Lanka
  • Communication Disability in Fiji: Community Cultural Beliefs and Attitudes
  • The Search for Successful Inclusion
  • Effect of Music Intervention on the Behaviour Disorders of Children with Intellectual Disability using Strategies from Applied Behaviour Analysis
  • The Effects of Severe Burns on Levels of Activity

 

Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities - Research

Rob Aley
et al
November 2016

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The aim of the research was to investigate the social, cultural and institutional factors which contribute to the high incidence of sexual abuse of persons with disabilities in East Africa and to identify interventions which could change detrimental attitudes, beliefs and practices which perpetuate this high incidence. The research is framed within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD), particularly articles 12, 13 and 16.

The study used a qualitative participatory action research approach and worked with local partner organisations and Ugandan and Kenyan field level researchers to collect data. Survivors of sexual abuse were not interviewed but instead the research investigated the understandings, beliefs and practices of a range of service providers and key responders who are involved in the prevention of and response to sexual abuse against persons with disabilities in their communities. Groups consulted included police, teachers, health-care workers, government administrators, faith and community organisations and traditional leaders, as well as persons with disabilities and their parents. Participatory workshops were run with a reference group of people with disabilities (with a range of impairments and experiences) and relevant specialists at the initial stage and during the participatory analysis process. After initial orientation and training the field researchers undertook a total of 52 individual interviews and 9 focus group discussions with a range of stakeholders.

The overall findings show that social attitudes and understanding of disability and sexuality in general are strong influencing factors on the risks that persons with disability face in relation to sexual abuse. Participants reported a range of harmful attitudes and beliefs about disability and about the needs and rights of persons with disabilities. It is very common for cases of abuse to go unreported and to be dealt with at the family or community level, rather than being viewed as a serious criminal matter which should be taken to the formal authorities. Many barriers exist, especially at community level which mean abuse does not get reported. Lack of awareness and knowledge, stigma and exclusion and poverty were key drivers of continuing abuse and survivors of abuse seldom get proper support. Guidelines, training and clear procedures for good practice in the various professions were generally weak or absent. Key recommendations were generated for both community level interventions and in relation to policy and training at regional and national levels. The practical implementation of some recommendations was undertaken.

Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities - Research

ALEY, Rob
et al
November 2016

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Abstract
The aim of the research was to investigate the social, cultural and institutional factors which contribute to the high incidence of sexual abuse of persons with disabilities in East Africa and to identify interventions which could change detrimental attitudes, beliefs and practices which perpetuate this high incidence. The research is framed within the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD), particularly articles 12, 13 and 16.

The study used a qualitative participatory action research approach and worked with local partner organisations and Ugandan and Kenyan field level researchers to collect data. Survivors of sexual abuse were not interviewed but instead the research investigated the understandings, beliefs and practices of a range of service providers and key responders who are involved in the prevention of and response to sexual abuse against persons with disabilities in their communities. Groups consulted included police, teachers, health-care workers, government administrators, faith and community organisations and traditional leaders, as well as persons with disabilities and their parents. Participatory workshops were run with a reference group of people with disabilities (with a range of impairments and experiences) and relevant specialists at the initial stage and during the participatory analysis process. After initial orientation and training the field researchers undertook a total of 52 individual interviews and 9 focus group discussions with a range of stakeholders.

The overall findings show that social attitudes and understanding of disability and sexuality in general are strong influencing factors on the risks that persons with disability face in relation to sexual abuse. Participants reported a range of harmful attitudes and beliefs about disability and about the needs and rights of persons with disabilities. It is very common for cases of abuse to go unreported and to be dealt with at the family or community level, rather than being viewed as a serious criminal matter which should be taken to the formal authorities. Many barriers exist, especially at community level which mean abuse does not get reported. Lack of awareness and knowledge, stigma and exclusion and poverty were key drivers of continuing abuse and survivors of abuse seldom get proper support. Guidelines, training and clear procedures for good practice in the various professions were generally weak or absent. Key recommendations were generated for both community level interventions and in relation to policy and training at regional and national levels. The practical implementation of some recommendations was undertaken.

Resource pack on systematization of experiences

HARGREAVES, Samantha
MORGAN, Mariluz
Eds
2009

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Systematization of experiences is a methodology that helps people involved in different kinds of practice to organize and communicate what they have learned. Over the past 40 years systematization has evolved and obtained recognition as a methodology for social reflection, in Latin America. This resource pack provides materials for the English speaking world

Civil society engagement for mainstreaming disability in the development process : report of an action research project initiated in Gujarat with multi-stakeholder partnership

UNNATI ORGANISATION FOR DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION (UNNATI)
Handicap International
2008

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This report describes "a three-year action research (2002-2005), in Gujarat, to understand the prevailing situation and invoking the participation of civil society groups for mainstreaming disability... The four key strategies adopted in the project have been detailed to share how civil society groups can be mobilised and invoked to take concrete action for promoting participation of persons with disabilities on local issues, creation of a barrier-free environment, developing materials for public education and social communication and influencing development organisations for mainstreaming disability"

We're too much in 'to do' mode: action research into supporting international NGOs to learn

Smit, Maaike
February 2007

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This paper has been produced by INTRAC (International Training and Research Centre) and PSO (an association of 45 development NGOs in the Netherlands). Using the experience of NGOs in the Netherlands, it is designed to support International NGOs in the process of organisational learning. The key focus is on 'self knowledge' - analysing how your organisation can reflect on its learning processes and capacities. The paper provides a practical exploration of how researchers and participants from organisations can use action research to evaluate organisational learning with a view to improving practice. This paper would be highly relevant for managers, consultants, researchers and other professionals involved with organisational learning within NGOs

Institutionalising participation and people-centred processes in natural resource management : research and publications highlights

PIMBERT, Michel
Ed
2004

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This report presents the background and rationale for the IIED-IDS action research on institutionalising participatory approaches and people centered processes in natural resource management. The methodologies used in the different case studies (India, Indonesia, Senegal, Mexico and other settings) are then introduced, along with the complementary studies undertaken in this collaborative research programme. The last section of this report contains highlights of all the publications in the Institutionalising Participation Series, and a summary of each

Can ICTs help the urban poor access information and knowledge to support their livelihoods?

SCHILDERMAN, Theo
2001

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This paper is based on a research project undertaken by ITDG and funded by DFID in to the knowledge and information systems of the urban poor. Using an action research approach, the research team found that the urban poor do require knowledge and information to improve their livelihoods, but there are gaps in what is offered; that social networks are the biggest information source, followed by key informants; that a wide range of 'infomediaries' supplies information, but again their are gaps; and that although there are a number of cases of strengthening the knowledge and information systems of the urban poor, ICTs are not yet playing a major role here

Worker-led participatory research and evaluation : lessons from the real world : reflections of the SREPP participants

ECKMAN, A
MCQUISTON, T
LIPPON, T
2000

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In 1997, four US union health and safety training programmes entered into a three-year, multi-union learning action-research collaborative, the Self-sufficiency Research and Evaluation Pilot Project (SREPP). This initiative sought to build the research and evaluation capacities of the participating unions' training by offering a new model of participatory learning and action in the area of worker health and safety. Existing examples of participatory action research in this field have tended to concentrate on single worksites and start with a stakeholder labour management model. By contrast, this project has sought to foster participatory learning across programmes from a union perspective. It uses and expands on the peer-training model to institutionalise a new base of worker produced knowledge. During the last of SREPP’s four training workshops participants reflected on their experiences in the project through a series of participatory activities. In this article the background to the project is followed by the words of SREPP participants describing what it takes to learn about and do participatory evaluation in the context of union-based, worker-led health and safety training programmes. This includes a look at what was learned and how, as well as supports and barriers to participatory evaluation and the model that they have developed

Reasons for resiliency : toward a sustainable recovery after Hurricane Mitch

WORLD NEIGHBORS
2000

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This report presents the methods and findings of an action research effort to measure and compare the impact of Hurricane Mitch on conventionally and agroecologically farmed lands in Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala. The project included farmers, promoters and local organizations as full partners in the research process, from beginning to end, and was designed to stimulate reflection and action based upon the lessons learned

Action monitoring for effectiveness : improving water, hygiene and environmental sanitation programmes. Part II : fact sheets

SHORDT, Kathleen
2000

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The action monitoring for effectiveness (aMe) approach focuses on application of monitoring theories and practical methods to improve programmes and projects in the short-term in the water, hygiene and sanitation sector. This is the second volume of two, and contains 32 fact sheets. Each fact sheet provides practical examples of indicators, methods and tools for monitoring a specific topic. Topics range from the concrete to the range from concrete issues more abstract issues such as community participation, management and distribution of benefits. They include: the community and its institutions, NGO and programme management, training, gender and finance, establishment of water services, operation and maintenance for water facilities, latrines and use of facilities and hygiene behaviour

Realife trust

REALIFE

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This website presents information about Realife, an action research development agency. The agency's original purpose was to work alongside up to 10 local families and to develop a range of initiatives based on their needs and preferences. Every project undertaken since then has been a result of requests from local people to set something up that they simply cannot find from their local authority or other voluntary agency. Information is oprovided about the services they offer and related news and resoruces

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