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2030 Agenda for sustainable development: Selected SDG indicators disaggregated by disability status

WASHINGTON GROUP ON DISABILITY STATISTICS
October 2018

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In light of the importance of disability data collection and the disaggregation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) outcome indicators by disability status, the Washington Group on Disability Statistics (WG) undertook an exercise to review, among WG member countries, the extent to which data on SDG indicators currently available can be disaggregated by disability status. Requests for disaggregated SDG data for 13 selected indicators were sent to 146 member countries. 48 countries responded and 39 provided data. Response data is tabulated and discussed.

Inclusive urban mobility and getting to work safely in developing countries

HUMANITY & INCLUSION (HI)
June 2018

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The lack of safe and accessible roads in many cities in developing countries impacts negatively on employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Between 20 to 50 million people worldwide suffer non-fatal injuries in road crashes every year; around 1.25 million are killed. Unsafe roads also represent a major factor of social exclusion, especially for ‘vulnerable road users’. These include notably pedestrians, persons with disabilities, cyclists and children. They represent 46% of road casualties. Persons with disabilities are at higher risk of sustaining injuries from road crashes.

 

In this thematic brief, the importance of inclusive urban planning is emphasised. Urban mobility and road safety challenges discussed include: safe crossing points over roads; signage and information; collective transport (particularly buses); accessing buildings such as offices or retail and driving with a disability.

 

Case histories provided are: Accessible transport as part of an inclusive jobs program in Senegal; and Modified vehicles and driving licenses for drivers with disabilities in Vietnam

 

Recommendations for improvements in policies and actions are given under the headings: 

1. Strengthening the policy and financial framework for safe and inclusive mobility action, based on evidence and through participative processes

2. Removing the barriers to safe and accessible mobility, focusing on: the built environment; transport and vehicles; people

Global AgeWatch Insights. The right to health for older people, the right to be counted

ALBONE, Rachel
et al
2018

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This report considers the progress being made to achieve older people's right to health amid the global drive towards universal health coverage. It explores how older people are currently accessing health services and what changes need to be made to improve on this. It considers the role of data in driving and informing changes to health systems and the services they deliver. Data must be collected with and about older people to ensure adequate evidence for service design and delivery that is targeted and appropriate. This report explores the adequacy of current data systems and collection mechanisms and how, alongside health systems, they must be adapted in an ageing world. 

 

This report is supported by 12 country profiles (for Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Kenya, Lebanon, Moldova, Myanmar, Pakistan, Serbia, Tanzania, Vietnam and Zimbabwe; see Appendix 1). These provide national information on trends in the physical and mental health status of older people, and population-level information on access to UHC. The profiles are supplemented by data mapping, showing the national data available on older people’s health in the 12 profile countries, and revealing the data gaps. The data mapping results are available at www.GlobalAgeWatch.org.

Brief - Financial access to rehabilitation services

Handicap International
October 2015

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Presentations from the seminar are reported on the themes of: a diagnostic tool, universal health coverage, financial access experiences, Madagascar’s experience and advocacy. Presentations included: The economic diagnostic tool for physical and functional rehabilitation and its deployment in Burkhina Faso, Colombia and Laos;  Equity funds and cash transfers, link with UHC; Universal Health Coverage, contributory and case management schemes usable in order to finance physical and functional rehabilitation; Vietnam: Orthopaedic devices and fair cost recovery system;  Burundi: Financial access to healthcare and performance-based financing; Burkhina Faso: Equity fund for rehabilitation projects; Mali, Rwanda, Togo: Evaluation of three rehabilitation equity funds; Nepal: Cost calculation of assistive devices; Madagascar Experience (Operating and financial access of orthopaedic devices and physical rehabilitation services of Pzaga Mahajanga University Hospital,  Social Welfare Policy and Universal health coverage in Madagascar, Mutual Health Insurances)

Universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable development. A synthesis of 11 country case studies.

MAEDA, Akiko
ARAUJO, Edson
CASHIN, Cheryl
HARRIS, Joseph
IKEGAMI, Naoki
REICH, Michael R.
et al
2014

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Universal health coverage (UHC) for inclusive and sustainable development synthesises the experiences from 11 countries—Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam—in implementing policies and strategies to achieve and sustain UHC. These countries represent diverse geographic and economic conditions, but all have committed to UHC as a key national aspiration and are approaching it in different ways. The UHC policies for each country are examined around three common themes: (1) the political economy and policy process for adopting, achieving, and sustaining UHC; (2) health financing policies to enhance health coverage; and (3) human resources for health policies for achieving UHC. The path to UHC is specific to each country, but countries can benefit from experiences of others and avoid potential risks

Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia

Lagomarsion G.
Garabrant A.
Adyas A.
Otoo N.
Muga R.
et al
September 2012

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The implementation of national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage by 9 low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia  is reported. Five countries at intermediate stages of reform (Ghana, Indonesia, the Philippines, Rwanda, and Vietnam) and four at earlier stages (India, Kenya, Mali, and Nigeria) are considered. These countries’ approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services are described using the functions-of-health-systems framework. Their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs is assessed using the coverage-box framework. Patterns in the structure of these countries’ reforms including use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations and steps towards broader risk pools are identified. Trends in progress towards universal coverage, including increasing enrolment in government health insurance and a movement towards expanded benefits packages are reported. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed.

Capacity development in disability and development for CLMV government officers

FOUNDATION FOR ADVANCED STUDIES ON INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (FASID)
June 2010

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This is a completion report of a disability project which started from July 2007 to June 2010 with the objective of enhancing the capacities of government officers engaged in disability issues to analyse, formulate and implement policies and programmes in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam (CLMV countries). This project report reviews and summarises FASID’s activities and achievements

Conducting quality impact evaluation under budget, time and data constraints

THE WORLD BANK‘S INDEPENDENT EVALUATION GROUP
2006

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“Project and program managers who wish to conduct an evaluation are often faced with severe budget, time or data constraints — these can act as a disincentive to conduct rigorous evaluations. The purpose of this booklet is to provide advice to those planning an impact evaluation, so that they can select the most rigorous methods available within the constraints they face”

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