Resources search

Uzbekistan: Case for inclusion

NAM, Galina
2019

Expand view

The Uzbekistan government has attempted to provide equal educational opportunities to children with disabilities in mainstream education. Despite these efforts, however, many children with disabilities remain segregated. The total number of children with disabilities under 16 years old in the country is 97,000 (Uzbek Society of Disabled People, 2014). The majority of them either study at specialised educational institutions, or receive home-based education.  While limited by the lack of reliable empirical data and research, this article aims to present the current situation in the development of inclusive education in Uzbekistan. It outlines the major legislative documents intended to support inclusive education and identifies some of the current obstacles to inclusive education practices. 

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 30, No 1 (2019)

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, Volume 30, No.1, 2019 (Spring 2019)

2019

Expand view

Research articles are:

 

  • Community-Based Rehabilitation Programming for Sex(uality), Sexual Abuse Prevention, and Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Scoping Review
  • Access to Social Organisations, Utilisation of Civil Facilities and Participation in Empowerment Groups by People with Disabilities in Amravati district, Maharashtra
  • The Arabic Version of Trinity Amputation and Prosthetic Experience Scale - Revised (TAPES-R) for Lower Limb Amputees: Reliability and Validity
  • Impact of Parenting a Child with Cerebral Palsy on the Quality of Life of Parents: A Systematic Review of Literature

 

Reviews:

  • Uzbekistan: Case for Inclusion
  • Physical Therapy for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Narrative Review

 

Brief report:

  • Exploring the Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments at the University of Botswana

Benchmarking antiretroviral prices in countries of the former Soviet Union

WANING, Brenda
et al
June 2008

Expand view

This study benchmarks ARV prices of former Soviet Union (FSU) countries against each other and against global and European region ARV prices. The study reveals that extreme price variation exists within and across FSU countries for identical ARVs, which suggests that some countries may be able to obtain ARVs at lower prices and therefore purchase additional ARVs to treat more people

Monitoring child disability in developing countries : results from the multiple indicator cluster surveys

UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF)
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
2008

Expand view

Using the ten question screen for children with disability in the multiple indicator cluster survey (MICS) in 20 countries, this report aims "to raise awareness and thereby both prevent new cases of child disability when that is possible and ensure protection and inclusion for children with disabilities. The findings presented in this publication provide decision-makers with basic information from a number of diverse countries that can be used to determine priorities related to child disability, including the prevention of childhood disabilities, the early detection of disorders leading to disability, and the timely provision of medical-rehabilitation services and comprehensive support to families with children with disabilities"

Programming experiences in early childhood development

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
November 2006

Expand view

This document presents examples and case studies from 21 countries. They demonstrate the benefit of cross-sectoral programming to support early childhood development, some building on early child care or education programme

Towards equality : creation of the disability movement in Central Asia

KATSUI, Hisayo
2005

Expand view

This study looks at a political approach to civic activism in the field of disability, which is an approach that the two fields of development studies and disability studies have begun to focus on as a driving force for susatinable structural change.
The findings in the study are based on interviews conducted with Central Asian disabled people. Three main findings emerged: a vulnerability creation mechanism for disabled people, the heterogeneity of disabled people and the implications for equality

Report of PLACE assessments in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, Central Asia : 2002 and 2003

ABDULLAEV, Shukharat
et al
July 2004

Expand view

This is a report on two PLACE assessments conducted in Tashkent in 2002 and 2003. The aim was to investigate whether there was an overlap in drug use and sexual networks, and to identify the implications for HIV prevention. The findings suggest that there is a significant overlap among youth, drug users and sex workers, and that the rate of new partnership formation remains high, while condom availability has decreased. It suggests that interventions need to focus on the sites where youth and drug users socialise and where sex workers solicit clients

PLACE in Central Asia : a regional strategy to focus AIDS prevention in Almaty and Karaganda, Kazakhstan; Osh, Kyrgyzstan; Tashkent, Uzbekistan. 2002

MEASURE EVALUATION
July 2004

Expand view

The PLACE method is designed to expose sexual and injection drug use networks, identify sites where high-risk populations overlap and help focus interventions where they are most needed. This report presents both a baseline assessment of HIV/AIDS risks and an evaluation of condom promotion programmes in four cities in Central Asia. The report shows that sexual and drug use networks are extensive and diffuse. The rate of new partnership formation is also very high, and the use of condoms with new partners is "quite high". Injection drug use is common, and needles are often shared. The report calls for programmes and interventions to concentrate their efforts on sites at high risk, where there is an overlap of high-risk populations (people meeting new partners, youth, injection drug users, sex workers)

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates