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DFID data disaggregation action plan - Better data for better lives

UK DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
UK AID
January 2017

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This action plan sets out the steps that the UK Department for International Development (DFID) will take to promote, provide and make use of their own development and humanitarian programme data which can be disaggregated on the basis of sex, age, disability status and geography (in the short term). It also has the objective to build the culture within DFID on disaggregated data, and to work with others to change the international development system on disaggregated data. A review is scheduled for 2020. Working with partners, influencing, capacity building and management information, research, analysis and reporting are outlined. Trailblazer country programmes with Bangladesh, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Rwanda are reported.

Satellite classes: A promising model for educating children and young people on the autism spectrum

CROYDEN, Abigail
et al
2017

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Results of research into attempts to provide the best of both mainstream and specialist education for autistic children are presented. The ‘satellite class’ model of supported inclusion is where the strengths of a special school education are kept in place for selected autistic pupils as they transfer to dedicated classes within mainstream ‘host schools’. The schools studied were all within the London borough of Tower Hamlets, UK.

Precarious lives and resistant possibilities: the labour of people with learning disabilities in times of austerity

BATES, Keith
GOODLEY, Dan
RUNSWICK-COLE, Katherine
2017

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This paper draws on feminist and queer philosophers? discussions of precarity and employment, too often absent from disability studies, to explore the working lives of people with learning disabilities in England in a time of austerity. Recent policy shifts from welfare to work welcome more disabled people into the job market. The reality is that disabled people remain under-represented in labour statistics and are conspicuously absent in cultures of work. We live in neoliberal- able times where we all find ourselves precarious. But, people with learning disabilities experience high levels of uncertainty in every aspect of their lives, including work, relationships and community living. Our research reveals an important analytical finding: that when people with learning disabilities are supported in imaginative and novel ways they are able to work effectively and cohesively participate in their local communities (even in a time of cuts to welfare). We conclude by acknowledging that we are witnessing a global politics of precarity and austerity. Our urgent task is to redress the unequal spread of precaritization across our society that risks leaving people with learning disabilities experiencing disproportionately perilous lives. One of our key recommendations is that it makes no economic sense (never mind moral sense) to pull funding from organisations that support people with intellectual disabilities to work.

Physical environments and community reintegration post stroke: qualitative insights from stroke clubs

BROOKFIELD, Katherine
MEAD, Gillian
2016

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This study investigated the environment’s role in community reintegration amongst persons with experience of stroke. Focus group discussions with 29 individuals recruited from community stroke clubs in Scotland revealed that stroke influenced a person’s perceptions, experience, use and enjoyment of the environment. Multiple specific (e.g. theatres, cafes) and more general (out-of-the- home) environments appeared capable of supporting community reintegration, providing settings in which individuals were able and willing to interact with others and participate in various functional, social and recreational activities. The article reflects on the study’s implications for policy and practice.

School toilets: queer, disabled bodies and gendered lessons of embodiment

SLATER, Jenny
JONES, Charlotte
PROCTER, Lisa
2016

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In this paper we argue that school toilets function as one civilising site [Elias, 1978. The Civilising Process. Oxford: Blackwell] in which children learn that disabled and queer bodies are out of place. This paper is the first to offer queer and crip perspectives on school toilets. The small body of existing school toilet literature generally works from a normative position which implicitly perpetuates dominant and oppressive ideals. We draw on data from Around the Toilet, a collaborative research project with queer, trans and disabled people (aroundthetoilet.wordpress.com) to critically interrogate this work. In doing this we consider ‘toilet training’ as a form of ‘civilisation’, that teaches lessons around identity, embodiment and ab/normal ways of being in the world. Furthermore, we show that ‘toilet training’ continues into adulthood, albeit in ways that are less easily identifiable than in the early years. We therefore call for a more critical, inclusive, and transformative approach to school toilet research.

Disability confident employer scheme and guidance

DEPARTMENT FOR WORK AND PENSIONS, UK
November 2016

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Guidance and resources from the UK Department for Work and Pensions about employing disabled people and about the Disability Confident employer scheme. Contents include: becoming a Disability Confident employer; guidance on employing disabled people and people with health conditions; aims and objectives; case studies; promotional material and inclusive communications. Updated following first publication July 2014.

Confessions of an inadequate researcher: space and supervision in research with learning disabled children

BENZON, Nadia von
2016

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Location is often at the fore of decision-making regarding fieldwork and choice of methods. However, little research has directly discussed the importance of the choice of site in the production of research data, particularly concerning the way that different relationships will manifest between researcher and participant in different spaces. Site may be particularly important in research with (learning disabled) children, as research location is intertwined with the level of caregiving required from the researcher, and the sorts of surveillance the research engagement may be subject to. This paper draws on research with learning disabled 6–16-year olds that took place in homes, schools and the outdoors, in a variety of microgeographical locations from bedrooms to nature reserves. This paper reflects on the challenges, including the very ‘worst’ research moments, occurring in the different research environments. Whilst the research was carried out with learning disabled children and young people, the discussion has implications for research with non-disabled children and ‘vulnerable’ participants more broadly.

Improving lives. The work, health and disability Green Paper

October 2016

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Employment rates amongst disabled people reveal one of the most significant inequalities in the UK today: less than half (48%) of disabled people are in employment compared to 80% of the non-disabled population. Despite a record-breaking labour market, 4.6 million disabled people and people with long-term health conditions are out of work leaving individuals, and some large parts of communities, disconnected from the benefits that work brings. People who are unemployed have higher rates of mortality and a lower quality of life. This green paper sets out the nature of the problem and why change is needed by employers, the welfare system, health and care providers, and all of us. Proposed solutions are set out  and views requested. (Consultation now closed)

04101608 10/16 

The autism employment gap report

The National Autistic Society
September 2016

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For nearly a decade, the full-time employment rate of autistic adults has stagnated. A survey we carried out in 2007 indicated that just 15% of autistic people were in full-time paid work. Shockingly, in this year’s survey, the figure was just 16%.

 

A similar number are in part-time employment, giving an overall employment rate of 32%. And while full-time work won’t be right for everyone on the autism spectrum, four in 10 of those working part-time feel under-employed. Others feel they are in low-skilled work and employers don’t see their abilities. They see their autism. They see a problem.

 

Meanwhile, employers have told us that they are worried about getting things wrong for autistic employees and that they don’t know where to go for advice. Autistic people are overloaded by too much information at work, and employers don’t have enough.

 

The UK Government has made a very welcome pledge to halve the disability employment gap by the end of this Parliament, meaning that they have to shift the disability employment rate from 47% to 64%. But the autism employment gap is even wider. For the number of autistic people in work to reach 64%, the Government will need to commit to doubling the number of autistic people in employment by 2020.

 

Both Government and employers need to take specific action to make this happen – without it, recent history tells us that autistic people will continue to be left behind

How are service users instructed to measure home furniture for provision of minor assistive devices?

ATWAL, Anita
MCINTYRE, Anne
SPILIOTOPOULOU, Georgia
MONEY, Arthur
PARASKEVOPULOS, Ioannis
2016

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Purpose: Measurements play a vital role in providing devices that meet the individual needs of users. There is increasing evidence of devices being abandoned. The reasons for this are complex but one key factor that plays a role in non-use of equipment is the lack of fit between the device, environment and person. In addition, the abandonment of devices can be seen as a waste of public money. The aim of this paper is to examine the type, the readability, and the content of existing guidance in relation to measuring home furniture.

 

Method: An online national survey involving health and social care trusts in the UK. We conducted a synthesis of leaflets associated with measurement of furniture to identify existing guidance. The content and readability of this guidance was then evaluated.

 

Results: From the 325 responses received, 64 therapists reported using guidance. From the 13 leaflets that were analysed, 8 leaflets were found to meet Level 3 Adult Literacy Standards (age 9–11). There were differences in the way in which the measurement of furniture items occurred within the leaflets with no measurement guidance reported for baths.

 

Conclusion: There is a need to standardize guidance to ensure that measurements are reliable.

Living in fear: experiences of hate crime and discrimination amongst people with learning disabilities and autism

BRADSHAW, Jill
RICHARDSON, Lisa
May 2016

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The views and experiences of people with learning disabilities and autism living within one UK unitary authority (Medway, Kent) were explored.  Aspects investigated were: how many people victimisation affects; who is affected by victimisation; what type of things happen to them; and the impact of victimisation on their quality of life.  The focus groups were: 7 groups with people with intellectual disability and autism (31 people); 4 groups with family and paid carers (33 people).  A survey was completed by: people with intellectual disabilities and autism (220 surveys) and family or paid carers (35 surveys).  27 individual interviews were carried out. 

The Equality Act 2010: the impact on disabled people. House of Lords Select Committee on the Equality Act 2010 and disability report of session 2015–16

HOUSE OF LORDS, Select Committee on the Equality Act 2010 and Disability
March 2016

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The committee considered whether the UK Equality Act 2010, a legislative framework, adequately supports the fight against disability discrimination and how it can be made to work better for disabled people. Aspects covered include: the Red Tape Challenge; the Public Sector Equality Duty; leisure facilities and housing; access to justice; the restoration of the Equality and Human Rights helpline and conciliation service; and communication. Major issues identified were the need to include disabled people in the planning of services and buildings and communication concerning this, the need to be proactive rather than reactive or process driven and the importance of enforceable rights. Statistics concerning disabled people living in the UK are presented. The development of the Equality Act, and it's relationship with the UNCRPD and with EU law are outlined.

‘First, do no harm’ : are disability assessments associated with adverse trends in mental health? A longitudinal ecological study

BARR, B
et al
November 2015

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“In England between 2010 and 2013, just over one million recipients of the main out-of-work disability benefit had their eligibility reassessed using a new functional checklist—the Work Capability Assessment. Doctors and disability rights organisations have raised concerns that this has had an adverse effect on the mental health of claimants, but there are no population level studies exploring the health effects of this or similar policies… Here the researchers used multivariable regression to investigate whether variation in the trend in reassessments in each of 149 local authorities in England was associated with differences in local trends in suicides, self-reported mental health problems and antidepressant prescribing rates, while adjusting for baseline conditions and trends in other factors known to influence mental ill-health”

 

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, doi:10.1136/jech-2015-206209

Understanding the interaction of competence standards and reasonable adjustments

HEWLETT, Katherine
NIGHTINGALE, Christine
STEVENS, Tony
July 2015

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“Higher education institutions (HEIs) have responsibility for developing non-discriminatory competence standards, and designing a study programme to address these competence standards. HEIs also have the responsibility to ensure that assessment methods address the competence standards. Adjustments to ways that competence standards are assessed may be required so that disabled students are not put at a disadvantage in demonstrating their achievement. This guidance aims to support HEIs meet these institutional and legal responsibilities, and promote disability equality” by providing information and examples on key areas. The guidance will be of use to all staff involved in developing and assessing competence standards

Beyond 2015 : shaping the future of equality, human rights and social justice

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY FORUM
EDF RESEARCH NETWORK
June 2015

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This publication is a collection of essays from Equality and Diversity Forum and EDF Research Network Beyond 2015 project. It presents a collection of articles about three main concepts: equality, human rights and social justice in the United Kingdom. The collection principally serves to describe levers for change and scenarios where equality and human rights could be promoted

Rethinking the work capability assessment

BAUMBERG, Ben
et al
March 2015

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This report outlines the key research findings about the Work Capability Assessment (WCA) criteria of the Employment Support Allowance (ESA), a means tested benefit for those who are unable to find work in Britain. It presents the state of the UK’s existing assessment and then describes how seven key countries systematically assess incapacity, and the lessons these countries provide for reforming the WCA in the UK

Online resource for parents and carers of children with autism

SIVARAMAKRISHNAN, Shobha
March 2015

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An information resource for the parents, carers and any other health professionals involved in the welfare of children on the autism spectrum. Within this document, it is outlined what is meant by the term 'autism', possible signs to look for in assessing and diagnosing a condition on the spectrum, associated physical or mental impairments which can be associated with a condition on the spectrum, and finally how a healthcare or other relevant professional (eg. education) may be best able to manage the condition in a variety of conditions

Note: The user has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

‘Disabled asylum seekers?… They don’t really exist’: The marginalisation of disabled asylum seekers in the UK and why it matters

YEO, Rebecca
2015

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This paper is based on a study conducted with disabled people seeking asylum in the UK, using art as a means to bring out and promote people’s key messages in public spaces. The findings suggest that people with these intersecting identities lack sufficient numbers, resources or allies to assert their needs and rights in statutory, nonstatutory or even peer support organisations in the UK. This results in such deprivation and isolation, that their very existence is often obscured. The paper argues that not only does such marginalisation cause unnecessary suffering among those directly affected, but also negatively impacts on the whole population. A hierarchy of entitlement may impede recognition of the causes and commonalities of oppression and therefore also hinder solidarity. Where reduced standards become acceptable for certain people, the imposition of similar standards on others is facilitated, particularly in the context of neo-liberal austerity. Many of the recent restrictions imposed on disabled citizens and other benefit recipients have been used on disabled asylum seekers for more than a decade. If, as Barbara Young Welke suggests (2010:156) the problem is systemic, then inclusion cannot be the solution. This paper concludes that systemic change is needed to end the differential ranking of people’s worth and to build greater solidarity.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 1

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2, No. 1 - Special issue: Disability and Forced Migration

2015

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Articles include:

  • EDITORIAL Towards a Critical Understanding of the Disability/Forced Migration nexus
  • Disability and Forced Migration: Critical Intersectionalities
  • Disability and displacement in times of conflict: Rethinking migration, flows and boundaries
  • ‘Ask us what we need’: Operationalizing Guidance on Disability Inclusion in Refugee and Displaced Persons Programs
  • Disability-inclusive healthcare in humanitarian camps: Pushing the boundaries of disability studies and global health
  • ‘Nowhere to be found’: disabled refugees and asylum seekers within the Australian resettlement landscape
  • ‘Disabled asylum seekers?… They don’t really exist’: The marginalisation of disabled asylum seekers in the UK and why it matters

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