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Every learner matters: Unpacking the learning crisis for children with disabilities

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2019

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This paper was developed by the World Bank in partnership with Leonard Cheshire and Inclusion International. It is an attempt to add knowledge to the current understanding of the importance of learning achievements, with a focus on children with disabilities. While the premise is that inclusive education refers to the inclusion of all children, the focus of this paper is on children with disabilities.

The aim of the paper is to:

  • Provide an evidence-based review of educational participation of children with disabilities.
  • Establish a case for focusing on learning achievements for students with disabilities.
  • Take stock of current mechanisms of measurement of learning outcomes and review their inclusivity.
  • Explore evidence of practice and systems which promote disability-inclusive learning for all. 

Four case studies are provided - from Pakistan, South Africa, Canada and UK.

More at risk: how older people are excluded in humanitarian data

TANYANG, Gaynor
VENTURES, Lumina
2019

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This report evaluates existing policies and practices on how older people have been excluded from data in disaster preparedness and humanitarian responses in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

In order to evaluate existing policies and practices in the collection of inclusion data, the research employed two main methods: a review of documents and a survey. The review of documents was conducted in three stages: a global literature review, followed by a policy review and a practice review. The survey analysed the responses of 72 respondents from 10 countries .

Bridging the gap – your role in transporting children with disabilities to school in developing countries

ACCESS EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL
AJUWON, Paul
January 2017

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This guide provides practical information for people who want to improve transportation for children with disabilities in developing countries. The guide will help parents and their children, teachers, heads of schools, and education officials to improve transport to and from school for children with disabilities. It will help transportation officials and transport providers, as well as agencies promoting sustainable development in developing countries. The guide addresses a variety of circumstances found in it's case studies, ranging from children with disabilities riding on school buses in large cities to children walking to school in some rural areas where roads do not even exist. Key findings and recommendations are presented from research carried out, case studies and interviews with school heads 

The wellbeing of children with developmental delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam: An analysis of data from UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys

EMERSON, Eric
SAVAGE, Amber
LLEWELLYN, Gwynnyth
December 2016

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This report, produced by the University of Sydney’s Centre for Disability Research and Policy (CDRP),
uses data collected in rounds four and five of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys programme (MICS) to describe the wellbeing of young children with and without developmental delay in six Asian countries. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) were used as a framework for identifying indicators of child wellbeing.

The report, authored by CDRP Disability and Inequity Stream Leader Professor Eric Emerson with Dr Amber Savage of the Family and Disability Studies Initiative, University of Alberta, Canada and CDRP Director Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn, found that children with Developmental Delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam are more likely than their peers to:
• Be living in poverty (SDG1). In five out the six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to be living in poverty than their peers
• Experience hunger (SDG2). In all six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to have experienced persistent severe hunger than their peers
• Suffer poor health (SDG3). On three indicators (poor peer relationships, diarrhoea and fever) children with developmental delay were more likely to have poor health than their peers. On three indicators (obesity, aggression and acute respiratory infections) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.
• Experience barriers to quality education (SDG4). On all four indicators (attendance at early childhood education centre, family support for learning, access to learning materials in the home, maternal level of education) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers.
• Experience barriers to clean water and sanitation (SDG6). On two indicators (improved sanitation, place to wash hands) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers. On one indicator (improved drinking water) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.

The authors noted that “Since the development of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1998, increased attention has been paid to monitoring the well-being of children. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and UNCRC both contain explicit provisions regarding the rights of children with disabilities. These impose obligations on governments to act to ensure that children with disabilities enjoy the same rights and opportunities as other children. In order to promote the visibility of children with disabilities, enable better policy, and monitor progress, disaggregation of data related to children’s well-being on the basis of disability is needed."

How CBM Australia supports engagement with government for disability inclusion and prevention

CBM AUSTRALIA
March 2016

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CBM Australia engages both directly and indirectly with governments. Indirectly, CBM Australia supports other organisations, for instance disabled people’s organisations or civil society organisations to engage with governments. This report looks at the different ways that CBM partners seek influence government and promote sustainability. It considers the different roles and relevance of activism, advocacy, service delivery and advisory approaches.

 

The cases in this report were identified and gathered through semi-structured interviews with CBM’s Program Officers, Technical Advisors, regional/country office and project staff in-country, as well as drawing on reports and evaluations. The report starts with a section explaining the four different approaches to working with government, followed by a brief introduction to each approach, highlighting what CBM are doing and the key lessons learned. Each section is followed by case studies giving more detailed insight into how CBM are engaging, key achievements, challenges and the lessons learned. Fifteen case studies covering key projects from CBM Australia’s International Programs and the Inclusive Development Team are described in this report.

The challenges of disability in Pakistan : listening to the voices of mothers

ALI, Rabia
RAFIQUE, Sana
November 2015

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“This study was conducted with the aim to explore the experiences of mothers in dealing with children having disabilities in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Through random sampling method 154 mothers of physically handicapped children studying in pre-schools and primary schools were selected as respondents…The data highlights that the disability of the children had been unexpected for all the mothers who participated in this research. The mothers reported to have been shocked (56%) and apprehended about the future of the children (41%)… The data demonstrates that measures taken by mothers to facilitate their children included seeking help from internet and engaging with support groups and friends”

European Scientific Journal, Vol.11

Participation and quality of life outcomes among individuals with earthquake-related physical disability: A systematic review

NUNNERLEY, Joanne
DUNN, Jennifer
McPHERSON, Kathryn
et al
May 2015

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A literature review to evaluate quality of life and participation outcomes of individuals with earthquake-related physical injury. A systematic review was performed searching MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL and AMED electronic databases from 1966 to January 2014. Studies that measured quality of life or participation outcomes among individuals who acquired a physical disability as a result of an earthquake injury were included, with no limits on research design. The search yielded 961 potentially relevant articles after removal of duplicates. Of these, only 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. Seven papers were reviewed from the following 5 earthquakes: 2001 Gujarat earthquake, India; 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China (also known as the Sichuan earthquake); 2005 Kashmir earthquake, Pakistan (27); 2009 Padang earthquake, Indonesia; 2010 Port-au-Prince earthquake.

Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol.47, no.5, 2015, 385-393

10.2340/16501977-1965

Prosthetic and orthotic services in developing countries

MAGNUSSON, Lina
October 2014

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This thesis aims to generate further knowledge about prosthetic and orthotic services in developing countries, with a focus on patient mobility and satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic devices, satisfaction with service delivery, and the views of staff regarding clinical practice and education. The findings are based on patient questionnaires in Malawi and Sierra Leone, including QUEST 2.0, as well as interviews with prosthetic/orthotic technicians in Sierra Leone and Pakistan

School of Health Sciences Dissertation series No. 56, 2014; No. 66, 2014

Moving from the margins: mainstreaming persons with disabilities in Pakistan

SURESH, Tricia
August 2014

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 This report examines the challenges, opportunities and policy issues affecting persons with disabilities in Pakistan. "The report makes strong recommendations for policymakers as well as the corporate sector and others. It advocates a comprehensive strategy through a gradual approach that includes policy intervention, awareness-raising and investment. The attitudinal, social and physical barriers faced by persons with disabilities in Pakistan also need to be challenged."

Inclusive disaster risk management : a framework and toolkit

FERRETTI, Silva
KHAMIS, Marion
2014

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This framework and toolkit have been designed to support practitioners in challenging and deepening inclusiveness in their work. They have been designed in simple language, so the resource should be easy to adapt for the use of field staff as a complement to existing manuals and operational resources on DRM. The practical framework contains the following sections:introduction, framework for inclusive DRM, levels of achievements, and assessing inclusiveness, using the framework for,  annexes and Q&A. Throughout the resource, related resources and checklists are provided and the toolbox features cartoons, tools catalogue, learning pills, case studies, poster and 4D lenses. These resources are useful for practitioners who want to develop an understanding of inclusive DRM framework and to learn how to practically assess inclusiveness in in ongoing DRM situations

Disaster risk management for all : for the inclusion of children, elderly people and people with disabilities

FEDERAL MINISTRY FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT (BMZ)
World Food Programme
GIZ sector programmes
Eds
May 2013

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This publication explains the links between disasters, disaster risk management and particularly vulnerable sections of the population including children, elderly people and people with disabilities.  It gives an overview of the experience to date and provides some practical suggestions on how to meet the needs of all people on an equitable basis through disaster risk management.  Specific activities to strengthen inclusive disaster risk management are provided in this guide for all vulnerable groups

BMZ Information Brochure 1, 2013e

The key informant child disability project in Bangladesh and Pakistan

MACTAGGART, Islay
MURTHY, GVS
2013

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The Key Informant Method (KIM) has previously been tested by CBM, LSHTM and others, and found to be a valid method for the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness in Bangladesh, using community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey. This report outlines a study that set out to expand this and test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangadesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria

Community volunteers : an asset for detecting and following up children with disabilities

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR EVIDENCE ON DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2012

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This video presents a  recording of a seminar held at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in November 2012.  The seminar explores the findings and recommendations from a four year CBM-funded project in Bangladesh and Pakistan to identify children with disabilities and connect them with appropriate rehabilitative services

Participatory evaluation report : mainstreaming disability in emergency response and local development

BARI, Nazmul
April 2012

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The report analyses findings from a project that aimed to improve quality of life of persons with disabilities and promote a social change by increasing their inclusion in humanitarian efforts and developmental programmes. The objective of the project, and this accompanying report, is to increase understanding and capacity of mainstream and humanitarian agencies, government bodies, civil society, NGOs and local organisations of how to include persons with disabilities in emergency response, early recovery and rehabilitation and developmental programmes.  The report will be of use to organisations that are mainstreaming disability within their own structures and supporting other organisations on these issues

Participatory evaluation report : mainstreaming disability in emergency response and local development

BARI, Nazmul
April 2012

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“The project “Mainstreaming Disability in Emergency Response and Local Development” implemented by CHEF International, Pakistan, supported by Light for the World was evaluated in March 2012. The evaluation attempted to understand the local context within which the project was implemented to enable a better reflection of learning including the project’s achievements, its ripple effects, limitations, barriers, and then to identify future directions”

Armed violence and disability : the untold story

THAPA, Rashmi
THALER, Kai
2012

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"This study aims to understand the links between armed violence and impairments that can lead to disabilities. It focuses on individuals who sustain impairments resulting from incidents of armed violence. The Disability Creation Process is adapted to analyse the combination of health problems, discrimination and socio- economic exclusion that can lead to disability for people who have sustained serious injury and/or lasting impairments as a result of armed violence...This report is written in a linear progression keeping the research project’s goals, objectives and approach as its backdrop. Chapter 1 (introduction) gives an overview of armed violence along with the justification of this research and its methods. Chapter 2 presents the findings from the four case study regions in countries, situated within its contextual analysis. Each case study draws on its discussion and summary of findings. Chapter 3 presents the discussion and lessons learned from this research, placing assistance and people at the centre of armed violence initiatives. Finally, a glossary, Annexes and references as endnotes are at the end of the report with notes at the end of every page"

Ageing and disability in humanitarian response : a resource book of inclusive practices

QURESHI, Waqas Ashfaq
Ed
June 2011

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This report reviews the contributions of international NGOs, NGOs, Disabled People Organisations and other stakeholders in the disability and ageing sector. Their responses to mainstreaming disability and/or ageing issues in humanitarian response in Pakistan are presented, and general recommendations are provided. This report would be useful to those who work with disabled and older people in disaster situations

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