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Women's Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) Programme for Results: independent verification, evidence, and learning

Monteath-van Dok, Adrienne
Lagaay, Mary
April 2020

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As part of the Department for International Development’s (DFID’s) Women’s Integrated Sexual Reproductive Health (WISH) programme, an evidence gap map (EGM) has been developed to map interventions on ‘what works’ to enable access to sexual reproductive health (SRH) services for persons with disabilities in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). EGMs are a user-friendly presentation of the available, relevant evidence for a particular sector, which is systematically gathered and mapped onto a framework, visually highlighting the gaps or concentration of evidence. This EGM aims to support WISH programming by consolidating evidence and identifying tools/approaches which could be brought into the programme. In addition, it aims to identify where evidence is weak and how the WISH programme can contribute to evidence generation.

This report provides a written accompaniment to the Evidence Gap Map (EGM) to explain the methodology, findings on the availability of evidence, and key recommendations. When scoping for this EGM, it was recognised early on that some of the best practices and interventions on ‘what works’ to support persons with disabilities access SRH services in LMICs are not always empirically tested. Therefore, a decision was made to develop an EGM which includes both peer-reviewed and grey literature. This approach diverges from the norm, as EGMs typically only include peer-reviewed literature.

Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Evaluation of Psychometric Properties of Persian Version of Supports Intensity Scale among Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

SALEHI, Sajed
JAVADIPOUR, Sheyda
NASSADJ, Gholamhossein
HAGHIGHI, Mohammad Hossein
SABOOR, Shiva
SHAKHI, Kamal
2018

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Purpose: This study was designed to translate and assess the psychometric properties of Supports Intensity Scale among adults with intellectual and developmental disability in Ahvaz and Tehran, Iran.

 

Method: The cross-sectional study was carried out in two stages. The first stage consisted of the forward-backward translation of Supports Intensity Scale - Adult Version) SIS-A(. In the second stage, 197 people with intellectual and developmental disabilities were recruited in order to assess the internal consistency and test-retest reliability, concurrent and content validity of SIS-A. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to approve the seven-factor model of the instrument.

 

Results: The intra-class correlation coefficient values varied between 0.85 and 0.99 (very good to excellent). All subscales of the SIS-A showed Cronbach’s alpha above 0.70. Correlation coefficient between SIS-A and Barthel index was about -0.65, which shows excellent concurrent validity of SIS-A. The findings showed SIS-A had high ability to discriminate between groups with different IQ (p<0.05). There was no significant correlation between SIS-A and the age of participants (p>0.05). The result of CFA confirmed that the seven-factor model of SIS-A is the fittest pattern for SIS-A.

 

Conclusion: The results indicated that the Persian version of SIS-A is a valid and reliable instrument to assess function and disability among people with intellectual and developmental disability.

The key informant child disability project in Bangladesh and Pakistan

MACTAGGART, Islay
MURTHY, GVS
2013

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The Key Informant Method (KIM) has previously been tested by CBM, LSHTM and others, and found to be a valid method for the identification of children with severe visual impairment and blindness in Bangladesh, using community volunteers in the place of a door-to-door survey. This report outlines a study that set out to expand this and test whether voluntary, community-level Key Informants (KIs) could be trained to effectively identify children with moderate or severe physical impairments, sensory impairments (visual and hearing) or epilepsy in Bangadesh and Pakistan, and if so whether this process could be used to assess prevalence and plan appropriate referral services for children meeting these criteria

Mainstreaming disability in the new development paradigm : evaluation of Norwegian support to promote the rights of persons with disabilities

INGDAL, Nora
NILSSON, Annika
2012

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"This report is the result of an external and independent evaluation of the Norwe¬gian Support to Promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in the last 11 years. The intention of the evaluation is to analyse the results of targeted and mainstreamed initiatives towards achieving the rights of persons with disabilities...The methodology included field visits in the four case countries: Malawi, Nepal, the Palestinian territory and Uganda to obtain a deeper understanding of how the rights of persons with disabilities have been promoted, and estimate the possible contributions of the Norwegian support. Afghanistan was included as a desk study"
Note: The report is available electronically and in printed version. A braille copy can be downloaded from the web. The four country reports, written in English, are available electronically. The summaries of the country studies are made available electronically, with translations to the relevant local languages Nepali, Arabic and Chewa. In addition an easy-read version in English and Norwegian of the main report is available electronically

CBR stories from Africa : what can they teach us?

COLERIDGE, Angela
HARTLEY, Sally
Eds
2010

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"Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) is an evolving concept. Its effectiveness depends on continuous reflection, debate and learning. This book aims to facilitate this process through the stories of five CBR programmes in Africa, told by those involved with the programmes and reflected on with honesty...Each of the five programmes has been invited to document their work, describing how its programme started and assessing the effectiveness of the approach it has chosen. They were asked to identify their successes and challenges, and to reflect on how difficulties are being overcome. Life stories illustrate the impact each approach can have on individual lives. The book offers itself as a reflective tool, to be used by practitioners. Each chapter asks specific questions of its readers, inviting them to draw comparisons with their own programme. The concluding section of the book outlines ideas for evaluating and developing their CBR programmes"

External evaluation of the community based rehabilitation program (CBR) in Jarash Camp, Amman, Jordan

YASSIR, Samar Al
November 2004

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This in an evaluation of a CBR project started in 1988 in a refugee camp. The general objective of the project is "to reach the biggest number of disabled persons in need of rehabilitation, and that an increased number of disabled persons live independently and are integrated in the society." Strategies include developing capabilities of disabled persons through the services offered by the Community Rehabilitation Centre, mobilization of local resources and awareness raising and advocacy.The evaluators found that the project urgently needs to include PWDs in the running of the project and to adopt a long-term strategy developing PWDs integration and economic autonomy. It also recommends a need for organizational change, improved monitoring and evaluation, staff motivation, and management and planning

Background papers : analysis of evaluation reports of six CBR projects

CAMARA, Tambo
DEEPAK, Sunil
October 2002

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This report presents an analysis of evaluation reports from six CBR projects in six countries through a number of standard key elements. The key elements used for reviewing the different evaluation reports have been grouped together in four categories: national policy & legislation; referral services; general aspects of CBR; and, participation. This resource is useful for anyone interested in CBR evaluations
Reviewing CBR, International Consultation

Female genital mutilation programmes to date : what works and what doesn't, a review

MOHAMUD, Asha A
ALI, Nancy A
YINGER, Nancy V
et al
1999

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This review looks at the status of female genital mutilation programming, the types of behaviour change strategies being implemented, their successes and failures, what lessons have been learned, and what support and strategies are required if the goal of eliminating female genital mutilation is to be achieved. The review focuses on the African and Eastern Mediterranean regions

Programme report 1997

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Global Programme for Vaccines and Immunization
1998

Programme report 1996

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Global Programme for Vaccines and Immunization
1997

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E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

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