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Missing millions: How older people with disabilities are excluded from humanitarian response

SHEPPARD, Phillip
POLACK, Sarah
McGIVERN, Madeleine
July 2018

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The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of older people with disabilities across a range of humanitarian settings, considering:

  • whether older people with disabilities have additional needs and challenges accessing humanitarian assistance and protection
  • what factors facilitate or limit access by older people with disabilities to humanitarian assistance and protection
  • to what extent is humanitarian response inclusive of older people with disabilities

A systematic literature review of published studies was conducted. Key online humanitarian guidelines were explored to review how far they explicitly address older people with disabilities. Data from six population-based disability surveys comparing the living situation of older people with and without disabilities were analysed. These included databases from two crises-affected populations in Haiti (post-earthquake) and Palestine. Data from four non-humanitarian settings was also reviewed to explore more broadly the situation for older people with disabilities – India, Guatemala, Cameroon and Nepal. Interviews were held with older people with disabilities, members of their families and local key informants in two conflict-affected populations in Ndutu and Mtendeli refugee camps in Western Tanzania, and Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Eastern Ukraine to find out about their experiences. Staff of five international agencies working in humanitarian response were also interviewed. 

 

Findings highlight particular issues facing older people with disabilities in humanitarian crises: more risk escaping from danger;  barriers to accessing social protection and work; barriers to accessing health and rehabilitation services; barriers to accessing food and other essentials; unsuitable housing and poor living conditions;  insecurity and discrimination; threats to dignity and independence; social isolation and loneliness; risks to mental health; and missing from humanitarian response.

 

A table brings together the findings from the different components of the research to show the needs, risks, barriers and enablers for older people with disabilities identified in the research. Recommendations are provided to humanitarian donors, policy makers and practitioners

Disability-inclusive social protection research in Nepal: A national overview with a case study from Tanahun district

BANKS, Lena M
et al
2018

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Social protection programmes are increasingly being adopted in low- and middle-income countries as a set of strategies for poverty reduction, improving livelihoods and decreasing inequality. Due to high levels of poverty and social exclusion, people with disabilities – who comprise upwards of 15% of the global population – have been identified as a key target group for inclusion in social protection, in both international guidelines and in national strategies. However, there is currently a lack of evidence on whether these programmes are adequately reaching and meeting the needs of people with disabilities.

The aim of this research was to assess the extent to which social protection systems in Nepal and Vietnam address the needs of people with disabilities. This research uses a mixed methods approach, combining a national policy analysis with district-level qualitative and quantitative studies in each country

STEP : an intervention to address the issue of stigma related to leprosy in southern Nepal

CROSS, Hugh
CHOUDHARY, Ramesh
December 2005

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"This paper focuses primarily on the extent to which a Stigma Elimination Programme (STEP) affected the social participation of people affected by leprosy in southern Nepal. The Participation Scale (popularly known as The P Scale) was applied to compare leprosy affected people who participated in STEP groups with a control group comprising leprosy affected people who lived in villages where STEP had not been implemented"
Leprosy Review, Vol 76, Issue 4

All of us count : part I. The involvement of affected communities in responding to HIV/AIDS

QUAN, Andy
WARD, Chris

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Aims to provide a tool which can be used to develop advocacy by communities affected by HIV and AIDS and to promote the involvement of affected communities in the response to HIV/AIDS at the local, national, regional and global level. Part 1 explains why the involvement of affected communities is important; describes a human rights approach; and highlights examples of the successful involvement of affected communities as well as how this has increased the effectiveness of the organisations involved

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