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World Health Organization global disability action plan: The Mongolian perspective

KHAN, Fary
et al
April 2018

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The aim of this literature review and research was to provide an update on disability and rehabilitation in Mongolia, and to identify potential barriers and facilitators for implementation of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Disability Action Plan (GDAP). A 4-member rehabilitation team from the Royal Melbourne Hospital conducted an intensive 6-day workshop at the Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences, for local healthcare professionals (n=77) from medical rehabilitation facilities (urban/rural, public/private) and non-governmental organizations. A modified Delphi method (interactive sessions, consensus agreement) identified challenges for rehabilitation service provision and disability education and attitudes, using GDAP objectives

 

Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Volume 50, Number 4, April 2018, pp. 358-366(9)

https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2207
 

Supporting inclusive movements: Funding the rights of women with disabilities

DOBSEN, Christen
October 2017

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This brief explores funding at the intersection of women’s rights and disability rights and offers steps donors can take to ensure that their grantmaking is more inclusive of women with disabilities and to support this emerging movement. Background is provided by recent mapping by Women Enabled International about the state of advocacy by women with disabilities, the amount of funding in 2014, sample grants and example use of them. Tips from peer donors and women with disabilities are given.

Strategy report on disaster risk management, reduction and response in Mongolia

JEGGLE, Terry
May 2013

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"The report summarizes the current Disaster Risk Management (DRM) situation in Mongolia and draws conclusions based on initial scoping assessments of the advisor. These observations underpin recommendations for further strategic policy and programme development in the country consistent with Government interests and through United Nations and wider international organizations’ involvement to strengthen the DRM and specifically disaster risk reduction (DRR) capacities of the institutional mechanisms, policies and regulatory frameworks in Mongolia. The author has based his analysis on present circumstances in the subject area since 2005, and it is projected from current conditions and suggested trends at the present time forward to anticipated needs and conditions up to 2020"

CBR matrix and perceived training needs of CBR workers : a multi-country study

DEEPAK, Sunil
et al
2011

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"This study shows that CBR Matrix can be a useful framework to understand field-level activities in CBR projects. The study has identified a number of priority learning needs, in terms of different domains of CBR Matrix, and in terms of different disabilities. It also shows that globally, areas related to advocacy, lobbying, legal protection and rights-based approach, are the most important learning needs identified by CBR workers"
Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development, Vol 22, No 1

Annual review of HRH situation in Asia-Pacific region 2006-2007

DING Yang
TIAN Jiang
August 2008

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"This report reviews the Human Resources for Health (HRH) status in the targeted countries by mainly focusing on health education and training, distribution and retention of health workers, community health workers. Eighteen countries have been included in the report: Bangladesh; Cambodia; China; Fiji; India; Indonesia; Lao PDR; Myanmar; Nepal; Philippines; Papua New Guinea; Samoa; Sri Lanka; Thailand; Vietnam; Australia; New Zealand and Mongolia"

Making schools inclusive : how change can happen|Save the Children's experience

PINNOCK, Helen
LEWIS, Ingrid
2008

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This report looks at how non-governmental organisations (NGOs) can help school systems in developing countries become more inclusive. It shares experience of developing tools and approaches that have improved education for the most excluded children in society. Taking examples from 13 countries around the world it describes case study programmes that: target specific groups of vulnerable children; build inclusive school communities; promote change throughout an education system; and address financial barriers to inclusive education. This report will be of interest to policy-makers, managers and advisers in government, donors and NGOs, and to education students

Training manual on disability statistics

UNITED ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2008

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This training manual enhances "the understanding of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) based approach to disability measurement. It provides an overview of the ICF framework as well as guidelines on how to operationalise the underlying concepts of functioning and disability into data collection, dissemination and analysis." This manual is useful for anyone who is interested in disability data collection and dissemination for both national and international disability policy analysis, formulation and evaluation

Monitoring child disability in developing countries : results from the multiple indicator cluster surveys

UNITED NATIONS CHILDRENS FUND (UNICEF)
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
2008

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Using the ten question screen for children with disability in the multiple indicator cluster survey (MICS) in 20 countries, this report aims "to raise awareness and thereby both prevent new cases of child disability when that is possible and ensure protection and inclusion for children with disabilities. The findings presented in this publication provide decision-makers with basic information from a number of diverse countries that can be used to determine priorities related to child disability, including the prevention of childhood disabilities, the early detection of disorders leading to disability, and the timely provision of medical-rehabilitation services and comprehensive support to families with children with disabilities"

Comparing disability questions for censuses and surveys in Asia and the Pacific

SMIT, Jan
LIU, Wei
February 2007

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“"This paper compares the construct and predictive validity of a set of disability questions tested on a sample of respondents in five Asia-Pacific countries. It finds that the construct validity of the Washington Group questions for the seeing, hearing, mobility and self care domains is good when WHO questions for the corresponding domains are used as a benchmark; this does not, however, apply to the questions for the cognition and communication domains. The Washington Group questions perform similar to corresponding WHO questions in terms of predictive validity. For the four models examined - explaining difficulty with household responsibilities, work and school, and joining community activities, as well as employment status - the different question sets perform similar in terms of significance and magnitude of the odds ratios"

Disability at a glance : a profile of 28 countries and areas in Asia and the Pacific

UNITED NATIONAL ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP)
2006

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This publication provides "...disability-related data and policy-related information so that readers are able to see in detail how a particular country or area defines disability and collects related statistics, and implements the Biwako Millennium Framework, in particular, with regard to the establishment of a relevant institutional framework and policies." It is intended "...that this publication will serve as a basis for continuing dialogue amongst the stakeholders on reviewing current status of Government commitments on disability and serve as an impetus for further actions"

Disability, poverty, and schooling in developing countries : results from 14 household surveys

FILMER, Deon
November 2005

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This paper analyses the correlations between a young person’s disability, the economic status of their household, and their school participation. The survey was conducted using 11 household surveys in nine developing countries. The results show that some youth with disabilities live in poorer households, but the extent is not statistically significant. However, young people with disabilities are often less likely to start school and show lower transition rates. This finding suggests that, in developing countries, disability may lead to long-run poverty since youth with disabilities are less likely to achieve qualifications which would allow them to earn higher incomes in their later life
The paper is useful for policy makers and professionals working in development
SP Discussion Paper No 0539

Disability issues in East Asia : review and ways forward

TAKAMINE, Yutaka
May 2004

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This paper provides "the World Bank’s East Asia and Pacific region with information and insights necessary for improving a focus on disability in its activities. There are two major parts to this paper. The first part reviews disability related issues in the region by describing (1) the prevalence of disability and related issues; (2) major issues and challenges confronting persons with disabilities; and (3) good practices, innovative approaches, and effective organizations in the region working to meet the needs of persons with disabilities. The second part reviews the Bank’s regional level activities through examining project portfolios and AAA products, as well as through interviews with Sector managers and staff members. Based on this review, the paper recommends ways to include disability issues at the regional and sector levels"

An inter-country study of expectations, roles, attitudes and behaviours of community-based rehabilitation volunteers

SHARMA, Manoj
DEEPAK, Sunil
July 2003

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"[T]his study gathered information from CBR volunteers in Eritrea, Egypt, India, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, and Vietnam (n=176) regarding their expectations, roles, attitudes and behaviours pertaining to CBR work. The survey revealed that majority of CBR volunteers volunteered their time as a personal decision (63%) and were not personally disabled (84%). It was found that satisfaction from CBR work was directly related to self-efficacy or behaviour specific confidence in their ability to perform CBR-related tasks, while inverse and significant relationships were found with barriers and outcome expectations. Thus, for retaining volunteers, CBR projects need to provide educational activities that build self-efficacy of volunteers to fulfill CBR-related tasks and reduce barriers"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 14, No 2

Moving forward : towards decent work for people with disabilities. Examples of good practices in vocational training and employment from Asia and the Pacific

PERRY, Debra
2003

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This book brings together more than 20 case-studies of programmes and approaches in helping disabled people gain skills, find employment and earn a living in the Asia-Pacific region. They include both centre- and community-based vocational training and income-generation programmes, employment services and partnerships

A case study of the community based rehabilitation programme in Mongolia

SHARMA, Manoj
DEEPAK, Sunil
January 2002

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"This paper presents a case study of the status of the community based rehabilitation programme in Mongolia. The case study is based on participatory dialogue conducted in the summer of 2000 with key personnel associated with the programme. The country has tried to implement a different model for the implementation of a CBR programme and must be one of the rare examples where such a huge geographical coverage has been achieved. At the same time, the difficulties in monitoring make it difficult to assess the real coverage in terms of access, acceptability and impact on the lives of disabled persons in the rural areas"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 13, No 1

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