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Road traffic injuries and rehabiliation. Factsheet.

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
March 2017

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The rate of road accidents is increasing globally and the resulting deaths, injuries, physical disabilities and psychological distress are creating a tremendous negative economic impact on victims, their families and society in general, especially in low and middle income countries. Common impairments and activity limitations from road traffic injuries are musculo-skeletal injuries, spinal cord injuries (SCI), traumatic brain injury and psychological distress and depression. Different examples of rehabilitation across the care cycle are provided. A case study of brain injury in Laos is provided. 

Making disability rights real in southeast Asia: Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in ASEAN

COGBURN, Derrick
KEMPIN REUTER, Tina
March 2017

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This edited collection evaluates national implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) across all 10 countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Working with interdisciplinary and country-specific research teams, the book presents case studies of CRPD implementation across Southeast Asia, including detailing the factors that influenced each country to ratify the CRPD; the focal point structure of implementation; the independent mechanism established to monitor implementation; and civil society organizations’ involvement.

The book also evaluates the implications of CRPD implementation for human rights and development in ASEAN, including the degree of institutionalized support for persons with disabilities; the development objectives of the CRPD against the strategic objectives of the ASEAN community; and the way these developments compare with those in other countries and regions

The wellbeing of children with developmental delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam: An analysis of data from UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys

EMERSON, Eric
SAVAGE, Amber
LLEWELLYN, Gwynnyth
December 2016

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This report, produced by the University of Sydney’s Centre for Disability Research and Policy (CDRP),
uses data collected in rounds four and five of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys programme (MICS) to describe the wellbeing of young children with and without developmental delay in six Asian countries. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) were used as a framework for identifying indicators of child wellbeing.

The report, authored by CDRP Disability and Inequity Stream Leader Professor Eric Emerson with Dr Amber Savage of the Family and Disability Studies Initiative, University of Alberta, Canada and CDRP Director Professor Gwynnyth Llewellyn, found that children with Developmental Delay in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam are more likely than their peers to:
• Be living in poverty (SDG1). In five out the six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to be living in poverty than their peers
• Experience hunger (SDG2). In all six countries children with developmental delay were more likely to have experienced persistent severe hunger than their peers
• Suffer poor health (SDG3). On three indicators (poor peer relationships, diarrhoea and fever) children with developmental delay were more likely to have poor health than their peers. On three indicators (obesity, aggression and acute respiratory infections) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.
• Experience barriers to quality education (SDG4). On all four indicators (attendance at early childhood education centre, family support for learning, access to learning materials in the home, maternal level of education) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers.
• Experience barriers to clean water and sanitation (SDG6). On two indicators (improved sanitation, place to wash hands) children with developmental delay were more disadvantaged than their peers. On one indicator (improved drinking water) there was no systematic difference between children with and without developmental delay.

The authors noted that “Since the development of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1998, increased attention has been paid to monitoring the well-being of children. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and UNCRC both contain explicit provisions regarding the rights of children with disabilities. These impose obligations on governments to act to ensure that children with disabilities enjoy the same rights and opportunities as other children. In order to promote the visibility of children with disabilities, enable better policy, and monitor progress, disaggregation of data related to children’s well-being on the basis of disability is needed."

Users’ satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: A cross-sectional study

DURHAM, Jo
SYCHAREUN, Vanphanom
SANTISOUK, Phonevilay
et al
December 2016

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"Abstract

 

Purpose: User satisfaction with assistive devices is a predictor of use and an important outcome measure. This study evaluated client satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices and services in three provinces in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

 

Method: A cross-sectional study was done, using the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology questionnaire. The sample was drawn from the client register of three of the five Rehabilitation Centres in the country which are under the Ministry of Health’s Centre for Medical Rehabilitation. Clients were eligible if they had received their device in the 12 months prior to the study. Based on the number of registered clients, the sample size was calculated as 274 with a 95% confidence interval, with the final sample N = 266. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were also conducted (N = 34).

 

Results: Most of the assistive devices were in use at the time of the survey and were reported to be in good condition (n = 177, 66.5%). The total mean score for satisfaction (services and device combined) was 3.80 (SD 0.55). Statistically significant differences were observed in satisfaction between gender and location of residence. Effectiveness and comfort were rated as the two most important factors when using a device; at the same time, these were the most common reasons for dissatisfaction and sub-optimal use.

 

Conclusion and Implications: Clients were quite satisfied with the assistive device and services provided, yet many reported barriers to optimal device use and difficulties in accessing follow-up services. There is a need to examine how prosthetic and orthotic devices can be improved further for better comfort and ambulation on uneven ground in low-resource contexts and to address access barriers."

Situation of wage employment of people with disabilities (Ten developing countries in focus)

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
December 2016

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One of the fundamental rights that is often denied to persons with disabilities is the right to employment. Based on 35 years of work with persons with disabilities in more than 60 developing countries, Handicap International has decided to study this issue of employment and disability. It challenges ten developing country teams to reach out to their local partners to capture the reality of employment today. This qualitative study gives very useful information about country teams’ vision of decent work for persons with disabilities in those environments where specialized resources are rare and inclusive policies remain in their infancy. Despite many obstacles, it identifies some positive promises and future tracks for better practices and efficient services. Many stakeholders, like local business and employment bureaus, are piloting innovative ways to get people to work, and to retain their skills as this positive dynamic evolves. Bringing these experiences to different audiences is the main goal of this document. Hopefully it will be the first piece of a more comprehensive data set and bank of best practices that reinforce access to decent jobs for people with disabilities wherever they happen to live in our global world.

Training social facilitators in personalised social support: Trainers’ booklet

LAFRENIERE, Annie
RELANDEAU, Audrey
KIANI, Shirin
December 2015

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This booklet is the gateway for a training kit on personalised social support (PSS). The aim of this training course is to train social facilitators either in the personalised approach only, or in how to carry out a complete PSS process. The aim of this booklet is therefore to impart the methodological and educational components required to use the content of this training course to Handicap International’s (now Humanity and Inclusion) future PSS trainers. It therefore takes another look at the entire content of the PSS training course, explains the educational choices, presents the modules and other teaching tools created, and above all, provides advice/recommendations for future designers and trainers/facilitators on this theme. Throughout this booklet, internet links provide the reader with quick access to the content of training courses and other relevant resources

Brief - Financial access to rehabilitation services

Handicap International
October 2015

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Presentations from the seminar are reported on the themes of: a diagnostic tool, universal health coverage, financial access experiences, Madagascar’s experience and advocacy. Presentations included: The economic diagnostic tool for physical and functional rehabilitation and its deployment in Burkhina Faso, Colombia and Laos;  Equity funds and cash transfers, link with UHC; Universal Health Coverage, contributory and case management schemes usable in order to finance physical and functional rehabilitation; Vietnam: Orthopaedic devices and fair cost recovery system;  Burundi: Financial access to healthcare and performance-based financing; Burkhina Faso: Equity fund for rehabilitation projects; Mali, Rwanda, Togo: Evaluation of three rehabilitation equity funds; Nepal: Cost calculation of assistive devices; Madagascar Experience (Operating and financial access of orthopaedic devices and physical rehabilitation services of Pzaga Mahajanga University Hospital,  Social Welfare Policy and Universal health coverage in Madagascar, Mutual Health Insurances)

Equal basis 2014 : access and rights in 33 countries

BURKE, Megan
PERSI VICENTIC, Loren
December 2014

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This report presents research about efforts to meet the needs and uphold the rights of persons with disabilities in four thematic areas: health care, rehabilitation, work and employment, and accessibility and enabling environments. Research findings are drawn from the experiences of landmine and cluster munition survivors and other persons with similar needs in 33 countries experiencing armed conflict or emerging from armed conflict or political or economic transition. Findings are placed within the context of relevant articles of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the World Report on Disability

Mainstreaming disability and ageing in water, sanitation and hygiene sector

JONES, Hazel
September 2013

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This report presents the findings of a desk study that provided an overview of the current state of disability and ageing issues in WASH, from the perspective of the WASH sector. Both disabled and older people were looked at together, because many frail older people, although they may reject the label ‘disabled’, experience impairments that limit their daily activities, which result in them facing similar kinds of barriers to accessing WASH

Toward a gender inclusive approach : assessment report and key recommendations

PEZIER, Sonia
2013

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This report focuses on the issue of gender and inclusion within Handicap International's organisation and its programmes in Laos. Current practises are identified and the gaps at different levels in each programme are noted. The report makes recommendations and provides an action plan to increase gender inclusion and develop capacity in a sustainable way

Accessible elections for persons with disabilities in five Southeast Asian countries

THE CENTER FOR ELECTION ACCESS OF CITIZENS WITH DISABILITIES (PPUA Penca)
GENERAL ELECTION NETWORK FOR DISABILITY ACCESS (AGENDA)
2013

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This report is the first systematic attempt to gather data on election access from Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, the Philippines and Vietnam. The report reviews, for persons with disabilities, existing legal frameworks, challenges and barriers in exercising political rights and participation; best practices and innovations; and examples of how disabled persons organisations have been involved in electoral issues

Inclusion made easy : part B|Disability inclusion : livelihood

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
May 2012

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The inclusion of people with a disability in all livelihood approaches, including formal employment, income generation projects, skills development and access to loans and financial services is important and practical support proposals are provided based on rights based principles including:

  • Awareness of disability and its implications
  • Participation and active involvement of people with a disability
  • Comprehensive accessibility through addressing physical, communication, policy and attitudinal barriers
  • Twin track enabling full inclusion through mainstream access working alongside disability specific supports

 

A case study Improving socio-economic support for people with a disability, based in Laos, is provided. 

There is a checklist for disability inclusion in livelihood programs.

Disability and poverty in developing countries : a snapshot from the World Health Survey

MITRA, Sophie
POSARAC, Aleksandra
VICK, Brandon
April 2011

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This paper outlines the economic and poverty situation of working-age persons with disabilities and their households in 15 developing countries. Using data from the World Health Survey, the study presents estimates of disability prevalence, individual-level economic well-being, household-level economic well-being, and multidimensional poverty measure. Detailed appendices are provided to support the results of the study. This paper is useful for people interested in the social and economic conditions of people with disabilities in developing countries
Social Protection Discussion Paper No 1109

Capacity development in disability and development for CLMV government officers

FOUNDATION FOR ADVANCED STUDIES ON INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (FASID)
June 2010

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This is a completion report of a disability project which started from July 2007 to June 2010 with the objective of enhancing the capacities of government officers engaged in disability issues to analyse, formulate and implement policies and programmes in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam (CLMV countries). This project report reviews and summarises FASID’s activities and achievements

Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income countries : a survey of health care providers

GUINDON, G Emmanuel
et al
May 2010

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This article discusses the results of a survey to examine the gaps that continue to exist between research based evidence and clinical practice. Health care providers in 10 low- and middle-income countries were surveyed about their use of research-based evidence and examined factors that may facilitate or impede such use. The conclusion is that locally conducted or published research plays an important role in changing the professional practice of health care providers surveyed in low- and middle-income countries and increased investments in local research, or at least in locally adapted publications of research-based evidence from other settings, are therefore needed. Although access to the Internet was viewed as a significant factor in whether research-based evidence led to concrete changes in practice, few respondents reported having easy access to the Internet. Therefore, efforts to improve Internet access in clinical settings need to be accelerate

Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income countries a survey of researchers

LAVIS, John N
et al
May 2010

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This article describes the findings from a study which examined efforts to bridge the gaps between research, policy and practice in 10 low- and middle-income countries in which researchers conducting research in one of four clinical areas relevant to the Millennium Development Goals: prevention of malaria (Ghana, Laos, Senegal and Tanzania), care of women seeking contraception (China, Kazakhstan, Laos and Mexico), care of children with diarrhoea (Ghana, India, Pakistan and Senegal) and care of patients with tuberculosis (China, India, Iran and Mexico) were surveyed

How-to-guide : preparing teachers for inclusive education

NGUYET, Dinh Thi
HA, Le Thu
2010

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"This guide aims to help CRS and partner education programs prepare teachers to implement successful models of inclusive education at the school level. It builds upon the previous publication while focusing more specifically on issues relating to teacher training and human resource development. Though the Vietnamese experience may not be universally applicable in all country contexts, it is hoped that the examples provided will serve as a reference of core themes that can be tailored to suit individual country needs"

Mental health and development sustaining impact : annual impact report 2009

RAJA, Shoba
DOUGHERTY, Charlotte
2009

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Basicneeds is an organization which aims to reach people with mental illness and epilepsy, to improve their health, financial well-being, and social acceptance. BasicNeeds provides treatment, training and promoted capacity building. This annual report presents BasicNeeds actions in 2009, highlighting their experiences in India, Sri Lanka, Lao PDR, Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, and Nepal

Annual review of HRH situation in Asia-Pacific region 2006-2007

DING Yang
TIAN Jiang
August 2008

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"This report reviews the Human Resources for Health (HRH) status in the targeted countries by mainly focusing on health education and training, distribution and retention of health workers, community health workers. Eighteen countries have been included in the report: Bangladesh; Cambodia; China; Fiji; India; Indonesia; Lao PDR; Myanmar; Nepal; Philippines; Papua New Guinea; Samoa; Sri Lanka; Thailand; Vietnam; Australia; New Zealand and Mongolia"

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