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Ancient remedies, new disease : involving traditional healers in incresing access to AIDS care and prevention in East Africa

KING, Rachel
2002

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This report presents three initiatives, in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, that have used an integrated approach to HIV prevention and treatment, combining traditional and biomedical health systems. In resource poor countries, traditional healers become part of the solution, helping provide a comprehensive response to the challenges of the disease, particularly when provided with adequate training. The report shows that implementation of programmes of this kind at larger scale could have the potential of bringing appropriate AIDS information and effective treatment to isolated communities at little cost

In the web of cultural transition : a tracer study of children in Embu District, Kenya

NJENGA, Ann
KABIRU, Margaret
November 2001

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The study compares children who were taught by preschool teachers trained in the two-year course run by District Centres for Early Childhood Education (DICECE) with those who had untrained teachers. The study, carried out in Embu District (Kenya), found significant differences between the two groups of children particularly in terms of performance in primary schools, with children cared for by DICECE-trained teachers faring better, and in relation to absenteeism, repetition and dropout rates

Establishing and sustaining HIV post-test clubs (PTCs) : lessons learnt from Kenya

WILDEMAN, Renske
TAEGTMEYER, Miriam
DOYLE, Vicki
October 2001

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This briefing outlines the objectives and activities of HIV Post-Test Clubs (PTCs), and, using a case-study from Kenya, looks at the lessons learned and at the challenges ahead. Post-Test Clubs are designed to raise community awareness about HIV/AIDS, and to advocate for community-based counselling and testing centres. The document calls for more openness about HIV status between members, a greater emphasis in HIV/AIDS self awareness, training for PTC members and regular monitoring and evaluation of club activities

HIV voluntary counseling and testing among youth ages 14 to 21: results from an exploratory study in Nairobi, Kenya, and Kampala and Masaka, Uganda

HORIZONS PROGRAM
KENYA PROJECT PARTNERS
UGANDA PROJECT PARTNERS
October 2001

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This is the report of exploratory research to identify the opportunities for and barriers to providing HIV voluntary counselling and testing for youth. The first phase of the study, completed in May 2000, indicates that youth would like access to HIV testing and counselling services if the services are confidential and inexpensive and if the results are reported honestly

Using evidence to change antimalarial drug policy in Kenya

SHRETTA, R
et al
November 2000

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This review analyses the range and quality of the evidence base that was used to change the drug policy in Kenya from chloroquine to SP and examines the process of consensus building and decision making. The review illustrates the difficulties in translating sensitivity data with gross geographical, temporal and methodological variations into national treatment policy. The process was complicated by limited options, unknown adverse effects of replacement therapies, cost, as well as limited guidance on factors pertinent to changing the drug policy for malaria. Although more than 50% of the studies showed parasitological failures by 1995, there was a general lack of consensus on the principles for assessing drug failures, the inclusion criteria for the study subjects and the relative benefits of parasitological and clinical assessments. A change in international recommendations for assessment of drug efficacy in 1996 from parasitological to clinical response further perplexed the decisions. There is an urgent need for international standards and evidence-based guidelines to provide a framework to assist the process by which decision-makers in malaria-endemic countries can make rational choices for antimalarial drug policy change

Agricultural knowledge and information systems in Kenya : implications for technology dissemination and development

REES, David
et al
July 2000

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This paper reports on a study of agricultural knowledge and information systems (AKIS) undertaken by the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute and the Ministry of Agriculture. Field research was conducted in four districts of Kenya, including high-potential and pastoral areas, to document and assess the significance of different actors and organisations as potential uptake/dissemination pathways for agricultural technologies, and to consider ways to improve the performance of the knowledge and information systems in the districts. Databases of the organisations, institutions and actors involved in agriculture in the four districts were compiled, and a series of participatory and rapid appraisal exercises were carried out with people concerned with agriculture in selected sub-locations and divisions within each district

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