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Social protection : how important are the national plans of action for orphans and vulnerable children?

SABATES-WHEELER, Rachel
PELHAM, Lissa
October 2006

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This is a review of 14 national plans of action (NPA), or in the absence of a NPA, outputs from the rapid assessment analysis and action planning (RAAAP) work for orphans and children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS. It analyses the way that issues of social protection are incorporated into these plans and highlights areas within the plans where social protection activity may be needed to achieve stated outcomes. There are also country by country summaries of the social protection content of each NPA

Teachers matter : baseline findings on the HIV-related needs of Kenyan teachers

KIRAGU, K.
et al
August 2006

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This paper summarises a baseline study on assessing changes in teachers’ knowledge of HIV & AIDS, risk behaviours (e.g., multiple partners and unprotected sex), and utilisation of voluntary counselling and testing. The workplace model will also aim to assist teachers who are infected with and affected by the disease through helping them to identify and access available treatment, care, and support community resources

Violence against young children : a painful issue [whole issue]

June 2006

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The Convention on the Rights of the Child condemns 'all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation', and yet cultural practices often tolerate or even encourage some forms of violence, such as corporal punishment, genital mutilation or forced early marriage. This issue of Early Childhood Matters aims to contribute to the debate around the concept and practice of violence, abuse and neglect. Includes case studies of projects designed to reduce violence at home, in schools and in the streets

East African Network for Monitoring Antimalarial Treatment

February 2006

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The East African Network for Monitoring Antimalarial Treatment (EANMAT) is a local initiative to strengthen the regional information base on parasite chemosensitivity, on which rational treatment policy can be based. The Network was formed in 1997 with three countries: Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Rwanda joined in 2000 and Burundi in 2002. The network has high-level commitment and support from the Ministries of Health in the countries involved. EANMAT brings together representatives of the National Malaria Control Programmes (NMCPs) of the member countries, together with other operational and research expertise. This provides a dynamic assessment of current antimalarial treatment, and the data upon which policy change can be based. The website provides a seachable database of malaria treatment efficacy patterns, a map of sentinel sites where this data is gathered, the network's newsletter (including back issues), which comes out three times a year and includes articles about drug efficacy, recent research, and treatment programmes, and a fieldworkers' guide to in vivo anti-malarial drug efficacy testing

Using social transfers to improve human development

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
February 2006

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This note provides an introduction to how social transfers - particularly cash transfers and vouchers - can improve human development, particularly for the extreme poor and socially excluded

Addressing violence against women in HIV testing and counselling

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2006

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This is a summary and recommendations from an international consultation co-convened by the WHO departments of Gender, Women and Health (GWH) and of HIV & AIDS to identify and review promising strategies or good practices to support women who may fear or experience violence as a consequence of HIV testing and/or HIV status disclosure; and develop recommendations to guide programmes and policies related to HIV testing and counselling, in light of current strategies to expand access to these and related services

Medicine prices surveys and proposed interventions to improve sustainable access to affordable medicines in 6 sub-Saharan African countries|Etudes des prix des medicaments et interventions proposeees pur ameliorer durablement l'acces aux medicaments dan

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2006

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This document brings together the outcomes of six surveys into medicine prices - for Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Tanzania, Chad and Uganda - and one for the East African Community (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania) . The reports for Mali and Chad are written in French and the others in English

Can communities influence national health research agendas? A learning process leading to a framework for community engagement in shaping health research policy

BATISTA, Ricardo
et al
2006

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This paper is a record of a consultation on 'Communities Matter' which reviewed case studies of successes and failures of community and civil society engagement, participation and action in health research. The group discussion focused on opportunities and obstacles for communities to engage in health research. It analysed strategies that can be applied to increase a community’s voice in health research, and looked at the concepts, definitions and frameworks that can be used for promoting, advocating and supporting community engagement in health research

Inside voices : CBR workers stories

OKUNE, Joan
Ed
2006

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This book is an output from three CBR writing workshops held in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi with the aim to facilitate the capacity of CBR workers to communicate their experiences thus increasing documentation of CBR practices in Africa. The book contains articles based on participants’ experience of CBR and is useful to anyone interested in CBR experiences in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi

Health rights of women assessment instrument

BAKKER, Saskia
PLAGMAN, Hansje
2006

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This is a practical tool for organisations that want to bring a human rights approach into practice. It contains practical guidance for a six-step rights based analysis of a policy. It has been developed together with a number of NGOs and women's organisations from the South and the North. The instrument focuses particularly on the health rights of women. In the future the same method may also be used for other issues. Health Rights of Women Assessment Instrument (HeRWAI) has been tested by organisations in Kenya, the Netherlands, Pakistan and Bangladesh and was improved on the basis of the experiences of the test. It is user friendly, with practical suggestions and easy references to relevant information. HOM offer support to organisations using HeRWAI

Missing the target : a report on HIV/AIDS treatment access from the frontlines

INTERNATIONAL TREATMENT PREPAREDNESS COALITION (ITPC)
November 2005

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The ITPC is a global alliance of over 600 treatment activists that include people living with HIV and AIDS and their advocates. This report is the first systematic assessment of treatment scale up based on the research of people living in communities in six countries where the epidemic has hit the hardest - the Dominican Republic, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Russia and South Africa. The report is based on their experiences and first-hand knowledge of the situation on the ground. Each country used a case study methodology, emphasising interviews with key informants. The report identifies barriers that could prevent efforts to make treatment more widely available and makes concrete recommendations for governments and international institutions

Delivering antiretroviral therapy in resource-constrained settings : lessons from Ghana, Kenya and Rwanda

RITZENTHALER, Robert
July 2005

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This publication is aimed at governments, development partners, and public and private health facilities seeking to provide ART as part of comprehensive care and support for people living with HIV and AIDS. It describes valuable lessons learned from several ART learning sites throughout Ghana, Kenya and Rwanda. By the end of April 2005, more than 5,800 new patients had initiated ART through this treatment and care initiative. Strategies, challenges and key recommendations are presented and comments by national and community leaders, providers and patients appear throughout the text to give readers a sense of the programs as they progressed. The lessons may not have direct relevance to all health facilities providing or planning to provide ART; it should be used or adapted depending on the epidemiological, political, social, cultural and economic context of each setting

Civil society involvement in rapid assessment, analysis and action planning (RAAAP) for orphans and vulnerable children : an independent review

GOSLING, Louisa
July 2005

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This review explores civil society organisations' experiences of the Rapid Assessement, Analysis and Action Planning (RAAAP) process - an initiative launched by USAID, UNICEF, UNAIDS, and the World Food Program - for orphans and other vulnerable children in November 2003. It comprises of a review of where civil society organisations were involved and where they were not and an overview of the process of their invovlement. It also offers recommendations for existing and future RAAAPs to ensure greater invovlement of civil society organisations, and includes individual reports on the 16 sub-Saharan African countries invovled in the first round of RAAAP in 2004

Using qualitative methods in studying the link between disability and poverty : developing a methodology and pilot testing in Kenya

GRUT, Lisbet
INGSTAD, Benedicte
June 2005

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"The report introduces a methodology for qualitative studies on disability and poverty. The purpose of the methodological approach is to uncover the mechanisms by which various types of impairments interact with barriers in the environment, to limit or influence the economic and social life of people with disabilities and members of their households. The pilot study was carried out in Kenya, and shows that the methodological tool is well suited to this type of studies"

USAID project profiles : children affected by HIV/AIDS

UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (USAID)
January 2005

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This document presents profiles of 114 projects (90 country-specific, 12 regional, and 12 global) funded by USAID. It includes a section on USAID projects that support access to education in Africa. The project profiles include the names of implementing organisations, funding periods and amounts, objectives, strategies, key accomplishments, priority activities for the year ahead, and materials and tools available to other projects that can help meet the needs of children and youth affected by HIV and AIDS. The diversity of these projects demonstrates the US government's efforts to meet the wide variety of needs of children and youth affected by HIV and AIDS. Approaches vary in both strategy and scale. The vast majority of projects work with communities to identify opportunities that strengthen existing resources without undermining local ownership. In many places, communities are already mobilised and have systems in place to identify, protect, and provide basic necessities to the most vulnerable children. USAID supports the strengthening and monitoring of these existing activities

An electronic medical record system for ambulatory care of HIV-infected patients in Kenya

SIIKA, A M
et al
2005

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The faculty at Moi University in Kenya and Indiana University in the USA opened adult and pediatric HIV clinics in a national referral hospital, a district hospital, and six rural health centers in western Kenya using a newly developed electronic medical record system (EMR) to support comprehensive outpatient HIV/AIDS care. The EMR contains more than 30,000 visit records for more than 4,000 patients, almost half taking antiretroviral drugs. This article describes the development and structure of this EMR and plans for future development that include wireless connections, tablet computers, and migration to a Web-based platform

Orphans and schooling in Africa : a longitudinal analysis

EVANS, David
MIGUEL, Edward
2005

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This paper looks at the impact of parent death on primary school participation using an unusual five-year panel data set of over 20,000 children in rural Kenya. There was a focus on children who began the study period as non-orphans and compare children who subsequently lost a parent to those who did not. There is a substantial decrease in school participation following a parent death as well as evidence of a drop before the death. Effects are largest for children whose mothers died, for young girls (under age 12) and for children with low base line academic performance. The authors then discuss implications for the design of programmes to assist orphans and vulnerable children

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