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Diabetes prevention and control projects in countries with limited resources|Lessons from experience : know-how analysis

BONARERI, Elizabeth
et al
December 2009

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This analysis paper presents the ‘know-how’ acquired by Handicap International in its diabetes prevention and control projects. It provides six practical know-how analysis sections focusing upon stakeholder mobilisation, services in communities, the decentralisation of diabetes care, diabetes clubs for persons with diabetes, supporting associations of persons with diabetes and conducting a study on a disabling disease project. This report would be useful to anyone interested in diabetes prevention and control in developing countries

Mobilising the community : a PILLARS guide

CARTER, Isabel
2003

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This guide looks at an example of community mobilisation that is based on using outside facilitators and workshops. However, recognising that resources to employ external facilitators and run such workshops may not be available, it takes the basis of the mobilisation process and shares it in a way that will help a well-organised and motivated group to use the process without outside help. It looks at participatory methodologies that can be used to focus on key community issues, how to gather information, presenting information and planning the action. It will be helpful to small groups or NGOs seeking to bring changes that benefit local people

In search of the rainbow : pathways to quality in large-scale programmes for young disadvantaged children

WOODHEAD, Martin
1996

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In this report, Martin Woodhead takes the four local studies conducted as part of the Bernard Van Leer project on 'The Environment of the Child' as a starting point for examining issues of quality development in early childhood programmes. These studies took place in Venezuela, Kenya, India and France. The aims of the publication are to (i) make explicit the frameworks of thinking that underpin judgements of quality, (ii) explore the possibility of working towards a shared frame of reference, which is context sensitive and allowing for diversity and (iii) apply this framework towards a better understanding of the quality issues that confront large scale early childhood programmes. The concept of 'the environment of the child' focused on those cultural variables relating to communities and individuals, directly affecting the development of children growing up in poverty. The author argues that sensitivity to diversity and to one's own preconceptions should be key elements informing all early childhood work

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