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Making Kenya ODF

MUSYOKI, Samuel
March 2012

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This community-led total sanitation (CLTS) blog outlines progress on CLTS in Kenya, noting the difference in approach in Ghana and Ethiopia, and highlights the new approaches taken by some disabled people, working towards the goal of making Kenya open defecation free (ODF)

The sustainability and impact of school sanitation, water and hygiene education in Kenya

NJUGUNA, Vincent
et al
2009

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This report details a study that investigated the impact and sustainability of school interventions for water, sanitation and hygiene education (WASH) in three districts in Kenya. The key findings of the study are: that sufficient taps for handwashing in toilets result in increased handwashing and cleaner toilets, and toilets that are clean and provide privacy are better used by children

Going to scale with community-led total sanitation : reflections on experience, issues and ways forward

CHAMBERS, Robert
2009

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Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is a revolutionary approach in which communities are facilitated to conduct their own appraisal and analysis of open defecation and take their own action to become open defecation-free. This report presents CLTS approaches in six countries which differ organisationally with contrasting combinations of NGOs, projects and governments. Practical elements in strategies for going to scale have included: training and facilitating; starting in favourable conditions; conducting campaigns and encouraging competition; recruiting and committing teams and full-time facilitators and trainers; organising workshops and cross-visits; supporting and sponsoring Natural Leaders and community consultants and inspiring and empowering children

 

Practice Paper, Vol 2009, No 1

Summary of results of the study on the impact and sustainability of WASH in schools research : Kenya and Kerala, 2006-2007

IRC INTERNATIONAL WATER AND SANITATION CENTRE
2009

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This report highlights the findings of two school water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) studies completed in the southern India state of Kerala and in three districts in Kenya. The key findings of both studies are that: children will wash their hands more if sufficient taps are provided; more children will use toilets if the facilities are clean and well maintained; perfect facilities alone do not ensure good WASH in schools, and both software and hardware inputs are needed. This summary if useful for people interested in WASH in school settings

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