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Missing the target #4 : time is running out to end AIDS - treatment and prevention for all!

INTERNATIONAL TREATMENT PREPAREDNESS COALITION (ITPC)
July 2007

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This report provides research from 17 countries to support the case that efforts to ensure universal access to treatment for HIV and AIDS are maintained and accelerated; that supplementary services are also provided free at the point of access; that there is increased investment in health care workers; and co-ordinated policy reforms. It also recommends that donors ensure sustainable funding for treatment programmes and identifies areas of weaknesses in global programmes. In addition, it provides focus reports for Cambodia, China, Malawi, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Zambia; brief updates on countries previously reported on: Dominican Republic, Kenya, Nigeria, India, Russia and South Africa; and short summaries on Argentina, Belize, Cameroon, Malaysia and Morocco

Kenya follow-up consultation report : target revision toward universal access to prevention, treatment, care and support by 2010

December 2006

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The consultation to select core targets, and to make revisions and updates to the existing Universal Access roadmap for Kenya became necessary following further guidance on country-level target setting subsequent to the initial consultation. The main revision consultation on 7 December brought together 36 participants representing the government, NGOs and specific interest/at-risk groups, UN and bilateral development partners. The work focused on prioritising core targets, as well as revising a set of targets deemed critical for Kenya . All the proposed core indicators, as well as most of the recommended indicators, have been incorporated in the M&E framework

Missing the target : a report on HIV/AIDS treatment access from the frontlines

INTERNATIONAL TREATMENT PREPAREDNESS COALITION (ITPC)
November 2005

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The ITPC is a global alliance of over 600 treatment activists that include people living with HIV and AIDS and their advocates. This report is the first systematic assessment of treatment scale up based on the research of people living in communities in six countries where the epidemic has hit the hardest - the Dominican Republic, India, Kenya, Nigeria, Russia and South Africa. The report is based on their experiences and first-hand knowledge of the situation on the ground. Each country used a case study methodology, emphasising interviews with key informants. The report identifies barriers that could prevent efforts to make treatment more widely available and makes concrete recommendations for governments and international institutions

Delivering antiretroviral therapy in resource-constrained settings : lessons from Ghana, Kenya and Rwanda

RITZENTHALER, Robert
July 2005

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This publication is aimed at governments, development partners, and public and private health facilities seeking to provide ART as part of comprehensive care and support for people living with HIV and AIDS. It describes valuable lessons learned from several ART learning sites throughout Ghana, Kenya and Rwanda. By the end of April 2005, more than 5,800 new patients had initiated ART through this treatment and care initiative. Strategies, challenges and key recommendations are presented and comments by national and community leaders, providers and patients appear throughout the text to give readers a sense of the programs as they progressed. The lessons may not have direct relevance to all health facilities providing or planning to provide ART; it should be used or adapted depending on the epidemiological, political, social, cultural and economic context of each setting

Women's stories, women's lives : experiences with cervical cancer screening and treatment

BOYD, Anne R
BURNS, Michele
Eds
2004

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This publication is a collection of stories based on interviews with women in developing countries who participated in ACCP programmes. These women's stories illustrate the unnecessary suffering cervical cancer can cause women and their families and how prevention programs can save women's lives. ACCP projects have focused on regions in which cervical cancer incidence and mortality are highest: sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and South Asia, and have also focused on reaching women in their 30s and 40s

Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adults : a guide for trainers

HORIZONS. Population Council
2004

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Successful HIV therapy requires 95% adherence. As antiretrovirals are becoming more widely available and an increasing number of ARV programmes are launched in developing countries, HIV patients need to be helped to strictly follow a treatment plan. This manual, one of the first adherence training tools developed in Africa, has been designed for health professionals in the province of Mombasa, but can be adapted to other contexts. It consists of four modules, each including Power Point presentations, suggested activities and additional informative material. Module 1 provides basic information on adherence, highlighting the consequences of non-adherence. Module 2 deals with all aspects of patient preparation for adherence and module 3 aims to provide trainees with specific skills in preparatory counseling for patients prior initiating ARV treatment. Finally, module 4 is designed to help health care providers assist patients during treatment

Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa : can family and community resources improve the odds?

MILES, M
2002

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Hydrocephalus and spina bifida are life threatening conditions that often result in severe dsabilities. Risks are much reduced by immediate surgery and careful managment, but neither has been available for most of the sub-Saharan African population. This paper traces the growth of solutions and some socio-cultural resources that historically have supported family and community care for children with severe disabilities, mainly in Tanzania, and nearby countries. Some community-based rehabilitation (CBR) work with children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus is described, and challenges to the CBR approach are noted from the increased survival of people with disabilities requiring complex care. More appropriate information, recognition of indigenous knowledge, enlistment of community resources and financial assistance are needed to enhance the lives of East Africans with hydrocephalus, spina bifida and other severely disabling conditions

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