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Orphans and schooling in Africa : a longitudinal analysis

EVANS, David
MIGUEL, Edward
2005

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This paper looks at the impact of parent death on primary school participation using an unusual five-year panel data set of over 20,000 children in rural Kenya. There was a focus on children who began the study period as non-orphans and compare children who subsequently lost a parent to those who did not. There is a substantial decrease in school participation following a parent death as well as evidence of a drop before the death. Effects are largest for children whose mothers died, for young girls (under age 12) and for children with low base line academic performance. The authors then discuss implications for the design of programmes to assist orphans and vulnerable children

Girls' education in Kenya

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
October 2003

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In January 2003 the Government of Kenya announced the introduction of free primary education. There are still wide gender disparities in some regions but overall children aged 5-8 now have greater access to primary education with girls enrolment at 69% and boys at 68%. Pre-school education age 3-5 years is also occurring within Kenya and pre-school enrolment rate is at 40%. UNICEF is working, among other things, to strengthen education on HIV/AIDS prevention and the care of orphans, and to promote an integrated approach to the implementation of ECD, HIV/AIDS and formal primary and non-formal education sub-projects

In the web of cultural transition : a tracer study of children in Embu District, Kenya

NJENGA, Ann
KABIRU, Margaret
November 2001

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The study compares children who were taught by preschool teachers trained in the two-year course run by District Centres for Early Childhood Education (DICECE) with those who had untrained teachers. The study, carried out in Embu District (Kenya), found significant differences between the two groups of children particularly in terms of performance in primary schools, with children cared for by DICECE-trained teachers faring better, and in relation to absenteeism, repetition and dropout rates

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