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Making it count: The power of youth advocates in the disability movement

WILM, Suzanne
LEONARD CHESHIRE
HANKS, Phil
May 2019

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The 2030 and Counting pilot project sought to give youth with disabilities a seat at the table on the SDGs – providing them with the tools and confidence they need to become their own agents of change. This report provides an overview of the project, together with learnings and recommendations for the future.

In its pilot year, 2030 and Counting brought together young women and men with disabilities and DPOs from Kenya, the Philippines and Zambia to report on and advocate for their rights through the framework of the SDGs

The project had three consecutive phases: Training, Story gathering (data collection) and Influencing. 

In total, 332 reports were collected between June and September 2018. The highest number of reports were submitted under the theme of Education (44%), followed by Work (33%), and Health (14%). The category of Other, which almost entirely focused on discrimination in daily life, accounted for 8%. 80% of reporters had smartphones, offering the potential to increase the use of this feature in future.
 

3rd World Disability & Rehabilitation Conference (WDRC 2018) - Book of abstracts

O'CONNOR, Loren
Ed
November 2018

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The 3rd World Disability & Rehabilitation Conference 2018 was held from 12th and 13th November 2018 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. People with disabilities and researchers, practitioners, policy makers, industry experts, university faculty and organizations along with advocates and volunteers working with people with disabilities participated and presented their original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, experiential or theoretical work through abstract and poster presentation. Total 33 participants presented their abstract and poster throughout this conference. The theme of WDRC 2018 was “Global advocacy and rights of people with disabilities”

The impact of an inclusive education intervention on teacher preparedness to educate children with disabilities within the Lakes Region of Kenya

CAREW, Mark
DELUCCA, Marcella
GROCE, Nora
KETT, Maria
February 2018

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There has been little empirical study within low- and middle-income countries on how to effectively prepare teachers to educate children with disabilities. This paper reports on the impact of an intervention designed to increase teaching self-efficacy, improve inclusive beliefs, attitudes and practices, and reduce concerns around the inclusion of children with disabilities within the Lakes region of Kenya. A longitudinal survey was conducted with in-service teachers (matched N = 123) before and after they had participated in a comprehensive intervention programme, delivered in the field by Leonard Cheshire Disability. Results showed that the intervention increased teaching self-efficacy, produced more favourable cognitive and affective attitudes toward inclusive education, and reduced teacher concerns. However, there was little evidence regarding the impact on inclusive classroom practices. The increase in teaching self-efficacy over the intervention period was also found to predict concerns over time. Results are discussed in terms of implications for international efforts, as well as national efforts within Kenya to promote inclusive education.

International Journal of Inclusive Education, vol.23, no.3, Feb 2018
https://doi.org/10.1080/13603116.2018.1430181

Everybody Matters: Good practices for inclusion of people with disabilities in sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes

Van SLOBBE, Caroline
November 2017

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This publication provides introductory chapters from two activists who work to create better opportunities for people with disabilities in Nigeria and India. Subsequently, the challenges that organisations worldwide have encountered whilst improving the access to and knowledge of sexual and reproductive health and rights for people with disabilities are presented. Ways in which they managed to find solutions and the results achieved are reviewed. Some cases show the importance of a more personal approach whilst others emphasise the advantage of changing systems and policies. Different regions, types of disabilities and various SRHR-topics are reflected in these stories. All cases provide lessons learnt that contribute to a set of recommendations for improved responses. The closing chapter highlights the challenges, solutions, and ambitions that are presented and lead up to a concise overview of recommendations.  

Good practice examples include:

A shift in SRH programming (Nepal)

Breaking Barriers with performance art (Kenya)

Her Body, Her Rights (Ethiopia)

People with disabilities leading the way (Israel Family Planning Association)

Best Wishes for safe motherhood (Nepal)

It’s my body! (Bangladesh)

Calling a spade a spade (Netherlands)

Four joining forces (Colombia)

Change agents with a disability (Zimbabwe)

Tito’s privacy and rights (Argentina)

Sign language for service providers (Kenya)

Bridging the gap – your role in transporting children with disabilities to school in developing countries

ACCESS EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL
AJUWON, Paul
January 2017

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This guide provides practical information for people who want to improve transportation for children with disabilities in developing countries. The guide will help parents and their children, teachers, heads of schools, and education officials to improve transport to and from school for children with disabilities. It will help transportation officials and transport providers, as well as agencies promoting sustainable development in developing countries. The guide addresses a variety of circumstances found in it's case studies, ranging from children with disabilities riding on school buses in large cities to children walking to school in some rural areas where roads do not even exist. Key findings and recommendations are presented from research carried out, case studies and interviews with school heads 

African Disability Rights Yearbook volume 5 2017

NGWENA, Charles
et al
2017

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This volume of the African Disability Rights Yearbook is divided into four sections presenting articles, country reports, commentaries on regional developments and a book review. The first section A of the journal presents a number of articles on issues affecting people with disabilities in Africa, ranging from education and rights of children with disabilities to albinism. Section B presents country reports on Djibouti and Madagascar. Section C presents two articles: one on mental health and the other on disability rights developments in the East African Community post-2012. Finally a review of E. Barnes’s 2016 book "The minority body: A theory of disability" is given.

 

Disability and the global South (DGS) 2015, Vol. 2 No. 3

DISABILITY AND THE GLOBAL SOUTH
2015

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This journal presents six articles in this collection about disability in several countries. Articles include research on typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, analysis of policy that aims to reduce the mental health treatment gap in Africa, research on inclusive education in Kenya and others

Disability & the global South (DGS), Vol. 2 No. 3

Making rights a reality : young voices on the UN convention of the rights of persons with disabilities

LEONARD CHESHIRE DISABILITY YOUNG VOICES
November 2013

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This report focuses on the organisation’s work in 14 countries on the implementation of the CRPD, and in particular on awareness raising, accessibility, education, work and employment, and participation in political and public life in respect to young people. The report highlights the progress made, spotlights the challenges ahead, and makes recommendations for each of the countries

Testing youth transitions in Kenya : are young people with disabilities falling through the cracks?

MUGO, John Kabutha
ORANGA, Josephine
SINGAL, Nidhi
2010

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"This paper focuses on the situation of young people with disabilities and examines the transitional opportunities available to them in Kenyan society, considering three principal areas: education, employment and social participation. The paper utilises the findings of a systematic analysis of relevant government reports and documents. Some of the issues raised are contextualised using data collected from one secondary school for the blind in Nairobi. (The) analysis indicates that, although their numbers are significant, young people with disabilities face difficult obstacles in progressing to higher levels of education. They are faced with limited employment opportunities and are at a greater risk of being exploited in the social sphere. Some policy options to tackle this situation are indicated"
Working Paper No 34

Improving the education response to HIV and AIDS : Lessons of partner efforts in coordination, harmonisation, alignment, information sharing and monitoring in Jamaica, Kenya, Thailand and Zambia

VISSER-VALFREY, Muriel
March 2008

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This report presents the overall findings from case study exercises carried out in Jamaica, Kenya, Thailand and Zambia to examine the quality, effectiveness and coordination of the education sector's response to the HIV epidemic. The report also makes recommendations for improving coordination across agencies in support of country-level and global actions. The case studies were carried out by the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team on Education

Conceptualizing disability and education in the South : challenges for research

SINGAL, Nidhi
December 2007

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This discussion paper introduces the challenges for designing research methodology for the Disability, Education and Poverty project. The paper explores the relationships between poverty and disability, highlighting disability is a cause and consequence of poverty, and discusses three central challenges for conceptualising the research project
RECOUP Working Paper 10

Violence free zone : end school-related violence, prevent HIV/AIDS

SALTER, Nick
SCHECHTMAN, Lisa
September 2007

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The objective of this call to action is to review the extent to which national education plans, the Fast Track Initiative, donor countries, and established international NGOs recognise and comprehensively combat school-related violence (SRV) in a review of 10 African countries. The brief contains five main sections and two Appendices. It outlines the details and consequences of school-related violence; and the major findings and broader trends from the country review process; it focuses on a discussion of models and programs employed to effectively counter SRV and highlights overall best practices; it reviews and critiques donor governments and international agencies in relation to their work on SRV; and it outlines the recommendations and call to action for going to scale with programmes to counter SRV

See me, and do not forget me : people with disabilities in Kenya

INGSTAD, Benedict
GRUT, Lisbet
February 2007

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This report describes the situation of people with disabilities in Kenya and provides recommendations to contribute to the improvement of their living conditions. Using qualitative research, it examines "how cultural factors, inaccessible infrastructure and lack of resources prevent people with various mental, physical, and sensory impairments from participating in the economic and social lives of their communities, as well as how the living conditions and social barriers affects the presence of disabilities." This report is useful for NGOs and governments working with people with disabilities in Kenya

Programming experiences in early childhood development

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
November 2006

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This document presents examples and case studies from 21 countries. They demonstrate the benefit of cross-sectoral programming to support early childhood development, some building on early child care or education programme

Using social transfers to improve human development

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
February 2006

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This note provides an introduction to how social transfers - particularly cash transfers and vouchers - can improve human development, particularly for the extreme poor and socially excluded

Inside voices : CBR workers stories

OKUNE, Joan
Ed
2006

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This book is an output from three CBR writing workshops held in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi with the aim to facilitate the capacity of CBR workers to communicate their experiences thus increasing documentation of CBR practices in Africa. The book contains articles based on participants’ experience of CBR and is useful to anyone interested in CBR experiences in Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi

Orphans and schooling in Africa : a longitudinal analysis

EVANS, David
MIGUEL, Edward
2005

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This paper looks at the impact of parent death on primary school participation using an unusual five-year panel data set of over 20,000 children in rural Kenya. There was a focus on children who began the study period as non-orphans and compare children who subsequently lost a parent to those who did not. There is a substantial decrease in school participation following a parent death as well as evidence of a drop before the death. Effects are largest for children whose mothers died, for young girls (under age 12) and for children with low base line academic performance. The authors then discuss implications for the design of programmes to assist orphans and vulnerable children

Gender differences in time use among adolescents in developing countries : implications of rising school enrollment rates

RITCHIE, Amanda
LLOYD, Cynthia B
GRANT, Monica
2004

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Three research questions are addressed in this paper : 1) How does time use change during the transition to adulthood? 2) Does gender role differentiation intensify during the transition? 3) Does school attendance attenuate gender differences? The research addresses significant gaps in the literature, in particular the lack of attention to how time use is affected by school attendance. The study documents differences in time use patterns between students and non-students. Although female adolescent students still work longer hours than male adolescent students, the gender division of labour that typically develops during adolescence is greatly attenuated among students when time spent at work is measured by combining labour market work with noneconomic household work

State of the world's children 2004 : ­girls, education and development

BELLAMY, Carol
2003

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This year's report focuses on girls' education and its implica- tions for development. It presents the many benefits of educat- ing girls, examines the barriers that keep more girls out of school and the lasting impact such exclusion has on a country's development, details why education is the most effective means of combating many of the most profound challenges to human development and presents concrete and practical recommendations for the way forward

In the web of cultural transition : a tracer study of children in Embu District, Kenya

NJENGA, Ann
KABIRU, Margaret
November 2001

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The study compares children who were taught by preschool teachers trained in the two-year course run by District Centres for Early Childhood Education (DICECE) with those who had untrained teachers. The study, carried out in Embu District (Kenya), found significant differences between the two groups of children particularly in terms of performance in primary schools, with children cared for by DICECE-trained teachers faring better, and in relation to absenteeism, repetition and dropout rates

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