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Intellectual property rights and access to ARV medicines : civil society resistance in the global south|Brazil, Colombia, China, India, Thailand

REIS, Renata
TERTO, Veriano Jr
PIMENTA, Maria Cristina Pimenta
Eds
2009

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This book looks at "...the recent history and the many struggles related to advocacy for access to [antiretroviral] medicines of engaged civil society. Through the experiences of five middle-income countries - Brazil, China, Colombia, India, and Thailand." It presents "...the perspective of local civil society organisations about the national impact of intellectual property protection and access to medications. "These five countries were chosen due to their accumulated experience in this field, their capacity to produce generic medication, their activist efforts, and the exchange of ideas and information that already exists between them"

Community-based surveillance of antimicrobial use and resistance in resource-constrained settings|Report on five pilot projects

HOLLOWAY, Kathleen A
2009

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This document describes five pilot surveillance projects that were set up in India (three sites) and South Africa (two sites) with the aim of developing a model for undertaking integrated community-based surveillance in resource-constrained settings and generating baseline data. The methodology used in each area aimed to collect antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and use data from the same geographical area over time, but was modified to suit the particular characteristics of each site

Telling stories, understanding lives, working toward change

COPLEY, Kath
HAYLOR, Graham
SAVAGE, William
December 2005

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This paper considers the importance of listening to people's stories when working towards improving the lives and livelihoods of individuals and communities. "Stories are helping us learn more about the livelihoods of the fishers and farmers with whom we work in eastern India. We are engaged with these communities in processes and activities aimed at improving their lives and promoting changes in government policy and service delivery in aquaculture and fisheries. Stories are told in several languages by women and men who fish and farm, about their lives, their livelihoods and significant changes they have experienced. We also record stories as narrated to us by colleague-informants. The written and spoken word, photographs, drawings and films - all are used to document the stories of people’s lives, sometimes prompted by questions as simple as 'What do people talk about in the village?' Through the power of language, stories can be an entry point into livelihoods programming, monitoring and evaluation, conflict transformation and ultimately a way of giving life to a rights-based approach to development"

A briefing paper for DFID : update on China and India and access to medicines

GRACE, Cheri
November 2005

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This paper looks at the major developments in the Indian and Chinese pharmaceutical industries and the major opportunities. It considers how the agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) has been translated into domestic law in both countries; and the role India and China might play for either finished product or active pharmaceutical ingredient supply for domestic use or export, with regards to first-line recommendations for diseases like malaria and HIV

Processes and issues for improving access to medicines : willingness and ability to utilise TRIPS flexibilities in non-producing countries

BAKER, Brook K.
August 2004

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This paper addresses the varied ways by which a non-medicine producing country may lawfully utilise the agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) flexibilities, primarily by importing. However, it also briefly discusses means for promoting local production through pharmaceutical capacity building and through both compulsory and voluntary licensing. To help decision-makers in understanding and evaluating the opportunities and constraints of each alternative, the paper briefly describes their respective advantages and disadvantages in terms of developing countries’ sustainable access to more affordable medicines, highlighting differing legal interpretations, political realities and pragmatic administrative and economic constraints

Effective drug regulation : what can countries do?

WONDEMAGEGNEHU, Eshetu
1999

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This paper presents an overview of the development of drug regulation and the rationale for drug regulation. It also reviews the drug regulation situation in selected countries, examines key contributing factors to observed drug regulation weaknesses, and identifies the measures that must be taken to improve drug regulation

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