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How to include disability issues in disaster management : following floods 2004 in Bangladesh

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
September 2005

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After the 2004 floods in Bangladesh, Handicap International supported the most vulnerable groups through mitigation activities as well as disaster prepareness and management, with a particular focus on the special needs of the persons with disabilities. The purpose of this publication is to provide practical ideas and concrete knowledge to include disability issues in disaster management. Although it is based on floods, ideas can be adapted to any type of disaster

Community based rehabilitation practices and alleviation of poverty of people with disabilities in Bangladesh

ALAM, Khandakar Jahurul
BARI, Nazmul
KHAN, Masudul Abedin
June 2005

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This paper presents a problem analysis of the current issues for disabled people in Bangladesh. It also analyses critical issues and details further needs for community based rehabilitation and poverty alleviation. It is useful for people interested in community based rehabilitation in Bangladesh
Workshop on Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) and Poverty Alleviation of Persons with Disabilities
Bangkok, Thailand
5 July 2005

Village phone replication manual : creating sustainable access to affordable telecommunications for the rural poor

KEOGH, David
WOOD, Tim
2005

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This manual draws from the Grameen Village Phone programme in Bangladesh and Uganda, and contains how-to guidelines for replicating the experience in other countries. The programme helped poor women purchase mobile phones and sell the use of them on a per call basis. It allows for sustainable and affordable access to telecommunications, particularly useful in rural and remote areas. The manual provides a comprehensive discussion of all the steps that need to be taken. Topics covered include: business planning, stakeholders and partnerships, microfinance, company structure, training, human resources, monitoring and evaluation

Muslim responses to HIV/AIDS : case studies, key issues and ways forward

LIM, Shaheen
Ed
2005

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This book contains contributions to the Pre-International AIDS Conference Workshop. It begins with country specific case studies to review the responses to HIV & AIDS already implemented in Bangladesh, Thailand and South Africa. The second part of this publication explores key issues in HIV & AIDS - namely human rights and gender issues and the reasons why such issues need to be incorporated into programmes to address HIV & AIDS. The final part outlines the value of Islamic teachings that can be drawn upon in HIV & AIDS prevention and care, and the roles that should be played by government, religious leaders, and Muslim NGO activists in confronting the challenges presented by HIV & AIDS

WHO’s multi-country study on women’s health and domestic violence against women : summary report of initial results on prevalence, health outcomes and women's responses

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

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"Violence against women by an intimate partner is a major contributor to the ill-health of women. This study analyses data from 10 countries and sheds new light on the prevalence of violence against women in countries where few data were previously available. It also uncovers the forms and patterns of this violence across different countries and cultures, documenting the consequences of violence for women’s health. This information has important implications for prevention, care and mitigation... The high rates documented by the Study of sexual abuse experienced by girls and women are of great concern, especially in light of the HIV epidemic. Greater public awareness of this problem is needed and a strong public health response that focuses on preventing such violence from occurring in the first place...This study will help national authorities to design policies and programmes that begin to deal with the problem"

Processes and issues for improving access to medicines : willingness and ability to utilise TRIPS flexibilities in non-producing countries

BAKER, Brook K.
August 2004

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This paper addresses the varied ways by which a non-medicine producing country may lawfully utilise the agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) flexibilities, primarily by importing. However, it also briefly discusses means for promoting local production through pharmaceutical capacity building and through both compulsory and voluntary licensing. To help decision-makers in understanding and evaluating the opportunities and constraints of each alternative, the paper briefly describes their respective advantages and disadvantages in terms of developing countries’ sustainable access to more affordable medicines, highlighting differing legal interpretations, political realities and pragmatic administrative and economic constraints

Disability in Bangladesh : a situation analysis

THE DANISH BILHARZIASIS LABORATORY (DBL)
May 2004

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This report assesses the situation and needs in relation to disability in Bangladesh. It presents detailed information by assessing the prevalence, severity and causes of disability in Bangladesh, focusing particularly on children; by analyzing the current scope of initiatives on disability in the country in the public and private sectors and in NGOs; and by offering both short- and long-term recommendations for research, policy development and support for interventions in the health and education sectors. This report would be useful for those who are interested in disability policy development in Bangladesh

Water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people : report of second field-work in Bangladesh

JONES, H
REED, R
April 2004

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This report was produced as part of phase 2 of the Knowledge and Research project : water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people. It shows ways to include physically disabled people in mainstream development programmes. It summarizes the major findings of a research project and a seminar in Bangladesh. The report addresses development NGOs, and DPOs which aim to cooperate with mainstream development NGOs

Promoting rights-based approaches : experiences and ideas from Asia and the Pacific

THEIS, Joachim
2004

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This book is a collection of experiences with rights-based approaches from Asia and the Pacific. Part One looks at rights-based programming, and provides a general overview of rights-based approaches and their history. This is followed by a review of experiences of different rights-based organisations. Part Two translates human rights principles and standards into practical ideas for education and HIV/AIDS programming and for organisational development and management. Part Three presents four examples of rights-based programmes: promoting children’s participation in Vietnam, the Child Friendly District initiative in Ho Chi Minh City, confronting discrimination in South Asia and strengthening accountability for children’s rights through mass media. Part Four presents experiences and experiments with tools for rights-based analysis, planning, monitoring and evaluation. There is also a section on web resources on rights-based approaches, which lists some of the major organisations that are promoting rights-based approaches to development and relief work

Does dowry improve life for brides? A test of the bequest theory of dowry in rural Bangladesh

LUCIANA, Suran
et al
2004

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In recent years, dowry levels have risen to previously unforeseen levels. Among Hindus in north India dowry can amount to three or four times a family's total assets. Among Muslims in Bangladesh and hindus in South India, dowry has become commonplace whereas the practice did not exist a generation ago. The institution of dowry has been widely criticised, socially maligned, and legally banned. Some recent writings suggest that dowry persists because it is 'good for the bride'. This paper explores the association between dowry and the prevalence of domestic abuse to test this bequest theory of dowry. The study finds that, contrary to the bequest theory, married females who paid dowry at marriage have a higher likelihood of reporting domestic violence compared to those who did not. In addition, respondents who paid small dowries report much higher levels of abuse than those who paid large dowries. In fact, paying no dowry is just as protective, if not more so, in terms of preventing abuse as the largest dowry payments

Electronic immunisation registry and tracking system in Bangladesh

AHMED, M
2004

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This report summarises the 2001 development of a new computerised information system to register, schedule and track the immunisation of children, which was introduced by the Department of Public Health in Rajshahi City Corporation, Bangladesh. While no direct funding was provided for it, the assumed cost was not more than US $5000. The author concludes that system has been working well for the past three years. He also notes that the utilisation of ICTs in poor countries should be targeted at those intermediaries (such as health workers) who play a key role in the lives of the poor through high-contact service delivery. Empowering those workers and helping improve the effectiveness of their service delivery will do more for the poor than any number of e-government portals

Seeing in the dark

CURTIS, David
ALLEN, Simon
SOCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE REHABILITATION OF THE PHYSICALLY VULNERABLE, BANGLADESH (SARPV)
2004

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This paper is a reflection of the 'Seeing in the dark' project. It outlines the process, describes the installation, the project community and ownership, and evaluation tools used, and describes some significant outcomes. "‘Seeing in the dark’ was developed to respond to the challenge of finding new, innovative and appropriate advocacy tools for marginalised and vulnerable communities to strengthen their voice in their response to their own health and development needs. To explore the ways in which experiential understanding of disabilities can be developed, an approach that embraces working methods in both the arts and development was employed, resulting in the creation of an installation or interactive space"

Sociocultural explanations for delays in careseeking for pneumonia

CENTRE FOR HEALTH AND POPULATION RESEARCH
December 2003

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This article is printed in the Health and Science Bulletin produced by the Centre for Health and Population Research, based in Bangladesh. It outlines research conducted among parents in Matlab, Bangladesh, revealing how their beliefs affect household treatment of childhood pneumonia and influence delays in seeking care from trained providers. Many indigenous beliefs and social factors prevent primary care providers, particularly mothers, of pneumonia cases from obtaining prompt and appropriate help. For example, in fear of being blamed for poor caring practices, mothers are reluctant to share information about the illness with other family members. Intervention strategies designed to reduce child mortality associated with pneumonia need to address the cultural beliefs and challenges. Efforts should focus on involving family members such as the child's father or grandmother in early recognition of pneumonia cases. It also suggests that health workers use local terminology and cultural knowledge to communicate the need for prompt treatment with a trained provider

Water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people : report of field-work in Bangladesh

JONES, Hazel
REED, R
October 2003

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This report was produced as part of phase 2 of the Knowledge and Research project : water supply and sanitation access and use by physically disabled people. The purpose of the field-work was to ascertain whether or not Bangladesh would be suitable for in-depth field-work. The report documents the methodology used and the findings of the research

Evaluating capacity development : experiences from research and development organizations around the world

HORTON, Douglas
et al
2003

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This book is the result of the Evaluating Capacity Development (ECD) Project, begun by ISNAR in January 2000, which aimed to improve capacity development efforts in research and development organizations through the use of evaluation. It explains how the project used an action-learning approach, bringing together people from various countries and different types of organisations. Six evaluation studies were conducted over the course of three years: exploring capacity development in a rural development NGO in Bangladesh; towards strategic management in a Cuban agricultural research institute; understanding capacity development in a plant genetic resources centre in Ghana; assessing organisational change in an agricultural faculty in Nicaragua; strengthening participatory research capacities in a Philippines root crops research centre; and expanding capacities in a rural development institute in Vietnam. Chapter 1 provides background reading on the ECD project that gave rise to the book. Chapter 2 discusses basic concepts of organisational capacity, capacity development and evaluation. Chapter 3 addresses two fundamental issues: why managers should be concerned with organisational capacity development and why they should evaluate capacity development efforts. Chapter 4 discusses issues related to the 'how' of capacity development. Chapter 5 discusses partnerships for capacity development while 6 outlines approaches and methods for evaluating organisational capacity development. Chapter 7 discusses how to utilize evaluation processes and results to advance capacity development and performance in an organisation

Monitoring the status of health equity in Bangladesh : the BHEW survey 2002

AHMED, Masud Syed
et al
2003

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BHEW (Bangladesh Health Equity Watch) is a Bangaldeshi initiative established to determine whether the health situation in the country is improving and if those improvements are equitable. This report produced by BRAC gives an account of its current findings. Equity in health is defined as 'the absence of systematic and potentially redemiable differences in one or more aspects of health across populations or population subgroups defined socially, economically, demographically or geographically'. For example, while child mortality in Bangladesh has decreased, it is not known whether the decline has been equal for all groups within the population, such as the difficult areas to reach usually inhabited by ethnic minorities. In addition to child mortality, the report also focuses on nutritional status of the population including young children, and utilisation and accessiblity of the health care services. The report finds that the health of the disadvantaged groups has not much improved since independence. The information given is targeted at policy makers and programme implementers

Including disability issues into development : the experiences of Centre for Disability in Development (CDD) in Bangladesh

NOMAN KHAN, A.H.M
BARI, Nazmul
2003

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This paper discusses the mission of the Centre for Disability in Development (CDD) to address disability issues in development in Bangladesh through Community Approaches to Handicap in Development (CAHD). The paper looks at the components of CAHD, its implementation in terms of types of activities and organizations and specifically how the CAHD programme has been implemented by CDD in Bangladesh, with a breakdown of outcomes and impacts
Regional Symposium on Disability 2003

Unveiling darkness : situation analysis on disaster and disability issues in the coastal belt of Bangladesh

CENTRE FOR SERVICES AND INFORMATION ON DISABILITY (CSID)
2002

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The objective of this study was to study the situation of disabled people living in the coastal belt of Bangladesh to find out the understanding of local people on disabiliy issues; study the soci-economic status of disabled people; and analyse the situation of disabled people immediately before, during and after natural disasters

From many lands

NARAYAN, Deepa
PETESCH, Patti
Eds
2002

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This book presents the experiences of people who are worn down by persistent deprivation, and buffeted by severe shocks they feel ill-equipped to overcome. The stories reveal some of the reasons why poor people remain poor, despite working long hours day after day. They document the frequently demeaning encounters with state, market and civic institutions that distort the well-intended political, economic and social policies. This book focuses on the diversity of poverty in 14 countries and highlights the key findings

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