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Migration as a form of workforce attrition : a nine-country study of pharmacists

WULIJI, Tana
CARTER, Sarah
BATES, Ian
April 2009

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"There is a lack of evidence to inform policy development on the reasons why health professionals migrate. Few studies have sought to empirically determine factors influencing the intention to migrate and none have explored the relationship between factors. This paper reports on the first international attempt to investigate the migration intentions of pharmacy students and identify migration factors and their relationships"

Assessment of district performance in making progress towards MDGs in Bangladesh

DE ROOY, Carel
WANG, Siping
2009

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This brief paper seeks to make a trend analysis over the 2000 to 2006 period using eight indicators that could be compared over time to assess progress made in Bangladesh towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals. The indicators are: * Infant mortality rate (IMR), * Proportion of births not attended by skilled health personnel, * Proportion of children six to 59 months without supplementation of vitamin A, * Proportion of households without consuming iodized salt, * Proportion of households without access to an improved water source, * Proportion of households without access to an adequate sanitation facility, * Proportion of primary school age children not attending school, and; * Proportion of children under-5 without a birth registration

Sustainability and equity aspects of total sanitation programmes : a study of recent WaterAid supported programmes in three countries global synthesis report

EVANS, Barbara
et al
2009

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This report is a synthesis of three individual country studies on Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) activities in WaterAid programmes in Bangladesh, Nepal and Nigeria. The studies examined whether CLTS had led to sustainable and equitable sanitation behaviour change. The study explored whether achieving open-defecation-free (ODF) status is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the entire community to use and maintain hygienic latrines in the long-term. Also, where possible, the study explored the additional factors that enhance the probability that ODF status will translate into entrenched behaviour change, as well as the capacity of communities to move onwards up the ‘sanitation ladder’

Going to scale with community-led total sanitation : reflections on experience, issues and ways forward

CHAMBERS, Robert
2009

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Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is a revolutionary approach in which communities are facilitated to conduct their own appraisal and analysis of open defecation and take their own action to become open defecation-free. This report presents CLTS approaches in six countries which differ organisationally with contrasting combinations of NGOs, projects and governments. Practical elements in strategies for going to scale have included: training and facilitating; starting in favourable conditions; conducting campaigns and encouraging competition; recruiting and committing teams and full-time facilitators and trainers; organising workshops and cross-visits; supporting and sponsoring Natural Leaders and community consultants and inspiring and empowering children

 

Practice Paper, Vol 2009, No 1

Annual review of HRH situation in Asia-Pacific region 2006-2007

DING Yang
TIAN Jiang
August 2008

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"This report reviews the Human Resources for Health (HRH) status in the targeted countries by mainly focusing on health education and training, distribution and retention of health workers, community health workers. Eighteen countries have been included in the report: Bangladesh; Cambodia; China; Fiji; India; Indonesia; Lao PDR; Myanmar; Nepal; Philippines; Papua New Guinea; Samoa; Sri Lanka; Thailand; Vietnam; Australia; New Zealand and Mongolia"

Report on piloting of appropriate sanitation options for differently abled people (DAP)

DUSHTHA SHASTHYA KENDRA (DSK)
July 2008

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This report describes the implementation of a pilot project in urban slums in Dhaka, Bangladesh, that introduced appropriate and user-friendly sanitation options for differently abled people (DAP) including pregnant women, disabled and older people. The report outlines the project which focused upon adapting existing communal facilities to include DAP. It would be useful for people interested in inclusive water, sanitation and hygiene in Bangladesh.
The project was implemented by WaterAid Bangladesh's partner Dushtha Shasthya Kendra (DSK) in collaboration with Action on Disability and Development (ADD)

Pilot project on activities with differently able people (DAP) in Varshaw union under Manda upazila in Naogaon district and in Ouchpara union under Bagmara upazila in Rajshahi district

VILLAGE EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTRE (VERC )
May 2008

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This report describes the implementation of a pilot project in two areas in rural Bangladesh, to target differently able people including elderly, pregnant women, disabled people and children. The report highlights the challenges, lessons learned and recommendations, and gives a case study. Individually designed household latrines, rather than standard designs are emphasised, and photos show toilet seats that are presumably placed over a toilet hole. This project was implemented by WaterAid Banglasdesh's partner Village Education Resource Centre (VERC), with involvement of local government staff (Union Parishad officials)

Best practices in the socio-economic rehabilitation of persons affected by leprosy and other marginalised people in their communities: findings from nine evaluations in Bangladesh, India and Africa

VELEEMA, Johan P
2008

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This paper presents an overview of findings from the formal evaluation of 9 socio-economic rehabilitation programmes (SER), in 4 countries in Africa, in Bangladesh and in India from 2002-2005. Bringing together the recommendations resulted in a description of best practices in the implementation of socio-economic rehabilitation programmes, derived from actual experiences in different contexts.

All the 9 programmes focused on supporting individual leprosy-affected beneficiaries or their families. Four projects also supported other marginalised clients. The usual interventions were micro-credit, housing and sponsoring of education for the children.

The recommendations touched upon each of the five steps in individual rehabilitation: Selection of clients, needs assessment, choosing an intervention, monitoring / follow--up of clients during rehabilitation, and separation at the end of the rehabilitation process. The evaluators also suggested ways in which participation of the client in their own rehabilitation might be boosted, made recommendations for the organisational structure of programmes, on maximising community involvement and emphasised the importance of information systems and of investing in the programme staff. A number of recommendations were specific to the types of interventions implemented i.e, housing, education or micro-credit.

Evidence of the impact of SER on the quality of life of clients is limited, but suggests increased self-esteem and increased respect/status in the family and community.

 

Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, vol.19, no.1, 2008

The effect of family size and composition on fertility desires, contraceptive adoption, and method choice in South Asia

JAYARAMAN, Anuja
MISHRA, Vinod
ARNOLD, Fred
March 2008

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This research looks at the influence of family size and composition on reproductive behaviour in three South Asian countries - Nepal, India, and Bangladesh - that are known for strong son preference. Data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys, was analysed to see whether the choice of contraceptive method adopted (modern versus traditional; temporary versus permanent) and desire for another child differed by parity and sex composition of surviving children

Public and private sector approaches to improving pharmaceutical quality in Bangladesh

KOSTERMANS, Kees
et al
March 2008

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"Low-cost high-quality drugs benefit society and helps provide pharmaceutical companies a competitive edge. This study presents the issues that must be considered to achieve these common objectives in Bangladesh and explores options that the Government and the local industry could pursue. "Previous efforts to improve the drug quality in Bangladesh focused, without much success, on stricter regulation of the public market. This paper addresses this issue from a more private sector approach. The existing quality and price of pharmaceuticals are analysed and alternative mechanisms are explored to improve the quality and cost competitiveness of Bangladesh’s pharmaceuticals domestically and internationally"

Rickets : an overview and future directions, with special reference to Bangladesh

CRAVIARI, Thierry
March 2008

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"This article provides an overview of the history, epidemiology, clinical findings, treatment, and prevention of nu¬tritional rickets from both global and Bangladeshi perspectives. In so doing, an agendum for future research is proposed"
Rickets Convergence Group Meeting
Dhaka, Bangladesh
26-27 January 2006
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition (JHPN), 26(1)

Children with disabilities in Rajshahi City : a situational analysis

RAHMAN, Sadikur
KHANAM, Wahida
ISLAM, Zeenatul
February 2008

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This study analyses the situation of children with disabilities in Rajshahi City Corporation, explores the nature of rights violation, investigates the factors behind the vulnerability of children with disabilities and reviews the state policies and community attitudes

Making schools inclusive : how change can happen|Save the Children's experience

PINNOCK, Helen
LEWIS, Ingrid
2008

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This report looks at how non-governmental organisations (NGOs) can help school systems in developing countries become more inclusive. It shares experience of developing tools and approaches that have improved education for the most excluded children in society. Taking examples from 13 countries around the world it describes case study programmes that: target specific groups of vulnerable children; build inclusive school communities; promote change throughout an education system; and address financial barriers to inclusive education. This report will be of interest to policy-makers, managers and advisers in government, donors and NGOs, and to education students

Successful leadership : country actions for maternal, newborn and child health

PARTNERSHIP FOR MATERNAL, NEWBORN AND CHILD HEALTH
2008

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This document provides country-specific summaries of actions taken on a national level to improve maternal and child health. The summaries do not provide a comprehensive assessment of the progress made by individual countries, but demonstrate the importance of five factors: 1. Successful political leadership (Thailand) 2. Sound health policies (Indonesia and Tanzania) 3. Effective financing (Mexico) 4. Strong health systems (Nepal and Senegal) 5. Action to achieve equity (Bangladesh and Chile). Each summary covers: progress on MDGs, supportive policies and interventions, outcome, and key lesson

Menstrual hygiene : breaking the silence | Beyond construction : use by all|A collection of case studies from sanitation and hygiene promotion practitioners in South Asia

AHMED, Rokeya
YESMIN, Kabita
2008

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This paper provides information about an awareness-builidng programme from WaterAid Bangladesh focusing on the issue of menstrual hygiene. It highlights the incorporation of menstrual awareness and management in sanitation and hygiene programmes. This paper is useful for people interested in menstrual hygiene issues

Listen to our stories : words, pictures, and songs by young people with disabilities

HILLYER, Linda
2008

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Listen to Our Stories highlights poetry, essays, interviews, songs, journal writing, letters, and pictures that tell the personal stories of young people with disabilities. The contributors are young girls and boys aged 5 to 21, from varied backgrounds, different talents and a range of disabilities. This website may be useful to anyone interested in personal life stories and experiences, written or told by children and young adults with disabilities

Giving voice to the voiceless : a communicating for advocacy publication

September 2007

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Using a rights-based approach, this project sought to develop the capacity of poor and marginalised groups in South and South-East Asia both to influence practice and policy, and for information exchange and skills transfer by health and development agencies. The project focused on four main themes: training, advocacy, communication and networking, and the lessons learned from it are set out in the report

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