Community-based inclusive education

Community-based inclusive education includes a wide range of inclusive educational initiatives in the community. This type of education provides dynamic community-based learning environments and opportunities whilst empowering and encouraging the active participation of people with disabilities, other vulnerable groups and community members. These initiatives also include non-formal education community environments. This is supported by article 24 of the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities.

This keylist features resources that support community-based inclusive education. We welcome your feedback: please send comments or suggested additions to sourceassistant@hi-uk.org.

Selected resources

Books, reports, etc

Community-based rehabilitation : CBR Guidelines|Education component

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2010

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This component of the CBR Guidelines focuses on education and how to make it inclusive. It describes "the role of CBR is to work with the education sector to help make education inclusive at all levels, and to facilitate access to education and lifelong learning for people with disabilities." It outlines key concepts and then presents the core concepts, examples and areas of suggested activities in each of the following five elements: Early childhood care and education; Primary education; Secondary and higher education; Non-formal education; and Lifelong learning. This guideline is useful for anyone interested in the education component of CBR

Disabled village children : a guide for community health workers, rehabilitation workers, and families

WERNER, David
1999

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This well-known manual contains a wealth of information that is crucial for therapists, professionals and community groups. It deals comprehensively with all common childhood disabilities including polio, cerebral palsy, juvenile arthritis, blindness and deafness. It provides clear, detailed information and easy-to-implement ideas for rehabilitation at the village level, the development of skills, making low-cost aids and the prevention of disabilities

Family action for inclusion in education

ENABLING EDUCATION NETWORK (EENET)
2002

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This publication contains stories of family-based advocacy organisations which have helped to transform education systems in southern Africa, South Asia, Europe and Australia. Quotes from family and community members provide valuable insights into the activities, thoughts and feelings of parents involved in fighting for the inclusion of their disabled children. The guide is especially useful for family and community members who may feel isolated and want to form a support group or advocacy organisation, and also for teachers, teacher educators and policy-makers

Helping children who are blind : family and community support for children with vision problems|Ayudar a los niños ciegos : apoyo familiar y comunitario para niños con problemas de la vista

NIEMANN, Sandy,
JACOB, Namita
2000

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Children develop faster in the first five years of life than any other time, and children who are blind need extra help so they can learn how to use their other senses to explore, learn and interact with the world. The simple activities in this book can help families, health workers, and individuals to support children with vision impairment to develop their capabilities. Topics include: assessing how much a child can see; preventing blindness; helping a child move around safely; activities of daily living; preparing for childcare or school; and supporting the parents of blind children. The book is written in an easy-to-read style with illustrations and examples from southern countries

Helping children who are deaf : family and community support for children who do not hear well

NIEMANN, Sandy,
GREENSTEIN, Devorah,
DAVID, Darlena
2004

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This book was written primarily for parents and other caregivers of young children. It provides a wealth of well-illustrated practical information. The book gives a thorough overview of the different ways to communicate with hearing impaired children. It is written in an easy-to-read style with lots of illustrations and examples from Southern countries.

Inclusive education : where there are few resources

STUBBS, Sue
September 2008

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This comprehensive overview of inclusive education in resource-poor settings looks at the basis for and origins of inclusive education. The book explains the concept of inclusive education in depth, suggests how it can be implemented, and looks at specific case studies and contexts. This resource is useful for professionals and organisations interested in inclusive education in developing countries

Moving away from labels : a school for all

CBR NETWORK (SOUTH ASIA)
2005

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This manual describes the process of developing inclusive education practices in India and the need for future development. It outlines practical information and includes templates of individual education plans for children with disabilities in mainstream schools to aid their learning. The manual aims to enable families and teachers at the grassroots level to include all children into neighborhood schools

Overcoming resource barriers : the challenge of implementing inclusive education in rural areas

MILES, Susie
2000

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This paper examines inclusive education in rural areas and presents case studies highlighting potential barriers and solutions and lessons learnt. The summary of lessons learnt includes the following point: to embrace the whole school approach; to ensure specialist support is at national level; to ensure access to information for teachers; and to develop teacher training and create community involvement. This paper is useful for people interested in inclusive education in rural areas
A Symposium on Development Policy "Children with Disabilities and the Convention on the Rights of the Child"
Bonn, Germany
27-29 October 2000

Training in the community for people with disabilities

HELANDER, E
et al
1989

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This set of 33 manuals is a key training resource for CBR trainers and workers trying to improve the quality of life of disabled people living in developing countries. The manuals present the WHO model of CBR, comprised of a system of 'local supervisors' and a 'community rehabilitation committee'. The manuals address disabled people, school-teachers and families. They cover rehabilitation activities for all types of impairment, as well as training on cross-impairment issues such as breastfeeding, play, schooling, social integration and job placement

Databases

Community-based rehabilitation

ENABLING EDUCATION NETWORK (EENET)

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This database provides resources related to community-based rehabilitation and inclusive education. It includes articles, books, reports, toolkits/ manuals, and EENET’s newsletters articles. This database is useful for people interested in information about community-based inclusive education for people with disabilities

Journal articles

Engaging with the disability rights movement : the experience of community-based rehabilitation in southern Africa

MILES, Susie
1996

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"This paper argues that unless community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programmes enter into genuine consultation with the disability rights movement they are in danger of repeating the mistakes of institution-based rehabilitation. Partnership between CBR programmes, and disabled people’ s and parents’ organisations in southern Africa has led to the development of a more consumer focused approach to CBR Where disabled adults and parents have been fully involved in the design and implementation of programmes, CBR workers have a clearer understanding of disability as a development issue. Education, employment and poverty alleviation have been given a higher priority than medical rehabilitation in these programmes. The evolving concept of CBR and its relationship with the disability rights movement has been observed and documented by The Save the Children Fund, and forms the basis of this paper"
Disability & Society, Vol 11, No 4