Child centred approaches to HIV and AIDS

The resources in this key list are crosscutting in theme and explore the importance of young children’s participation in planning, implementing and evaluative processes. They attempt to address the question: “what can be done to include very young children in programming and policy responses in HIV and AIDS affected communities?” Although early childhood development programmes and resources are acknowledging the ability of young children to communicate and participate, methodologies to address issues of HIV and AIDS are few. Communication with children needs to take place, not only to inform processes of interventions that support them and their caregivers, but also to encourage openness around difficult subjects like HIV and AIDS status and death. This approach ensures attention to all children including those that can be excluded from policy such as nomadic children, children from religious and indigenous minorities or disabled children.

We welcome your feedback: please send comments or suggested additions to sourceassistant@hi-uk.org.

Selected resources

Books, reports, etc

Children in crisis : good practices in evaluating psychosocial programming

DUNCAN, Joan,
ARNTSON, Laura
2004

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This manual attempts to articulate major principles of psychosocial project design and evaluation practices in concise, user-friendly terms. It is intended for field-based managers and coordinators of psychosocial programming, as well as for managers of emergency relief programmes who may want to integrate psychosocial programming methods into more traditional relief efforts, such as food distribution, construction projects, and medical assistance. The manual also seeks to heighten critical awareness of the cultural and ethical issues associated with psychosocial work

Community based care for separated children

TOLFREE, David K
2003

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The International Save the Children’s Alliance organised a project called ‘Care and Protection of Separated Children in Emergencies’ to address the issue of children that are separated from their parents in situations of armed conflict, natural disasters, pandemics such as AIDS and various forms of exploitation and abuse. The initiative explored issues of fostering, group care, and other types of care arrangements for children. The project produced case studies in 6 countries. Participatory research with children was a key theme. This paper offers a ten-point analysis of the typical negative features of institutional care and then looks at community based care. This is done firstly under the heading of preventative approaches to avoid the unnecessary separation of children, then alternative care strategies such as community based care. There are some concluding comments pointing towards the need for further research and the need to place more emphasis on what children themselves have to say in research, in policy formulation and in developing good practice

Conducting a participatory situation analysis of orphans and vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS : guidelines and tools | A framework and resource guide

FAMILY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL (FHI)
April 2005

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This framework and resource guide is intended to help people involved in programs assisting orphans and vulnerable children conduct a situation analysis. It serves as a tool for collecting and synthesising in-country and sub-national information. Examples of situation analyses and related research are provided throughout the document to draw upon the variety of approaches, and their components, that communities and institutions have undertaken to assess their particular situation

HIV/AIDS : what about very young children?

DUNN, Alison
July 2004

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This short paper reflects findings from research carried out to identify current responses to meet the needs of children age 0-8 living in HIV/AIDS affected communities. The overall results show that at local, national and international levels there are gaps in programming and policy to engage ideas and mobilise resources to address the needs and experiences of very young children both infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. The question is then raised: What can we actually do to include very young children in programming and policy responses in HIV/AIDS affected communities? Supporting existing family and community networks and current efforts that are being made by people confronting HIV/AIDS on a daily basis are important strategies. Conclusions are drawn indicating that services are required urgently to support very young children both directly and through the families and communities in which they live. Ways of listening to and including very young children in these processes need to be developed and used. Partnerships need to be developed between parents, families, NGOs, CBOs and government to ensure the holistic development of the child. At policy levels, very young children need to be included in programmes that address children, HIV/AIDS and community development. All government ministries can participate in meeting the needs of very young children in HIV/AIDS affected communities

Orphans and vulnerable children in India : understanding the context and the response

GOLDMAN, Judith,
ANASTASI, Marie-Christine
June 2003

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A report from a meeting for exchange and learning between organisations working with orphans and vulnerable children in India, looking community responses to working with this group. The experience of Plan International, Palmyrah Workers Development Society and the International HIV/AIDS Alliance was presented to the meeting. Specific responses to working with orphans and vulnerable children discussed in the report include lessons from a child participatory approach, prevention of mother-to-child transmission and the development of community action

Websites

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)

February 2006

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The Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) is a global network that disseminates information about the Convention on the Rights of the Child and child rights among non-governmental organisations (NGOs), United Nations agencies, educational institutions, and other child rights experts. The Coordinating Unit is based in London, UK. The Convention on the Rights of the Child is available from this site as well as NGO alternative reports, international treaties, and a directory of organisations working in child rights. The CRIN newsletter, published three times a year, is a thematic publication that examines a specific issue affecting children. The CRINMAIL email lists provide regular news bulletins about child rights issues as well as information about new publications and events in English, French and Spanish, and on specific topic areas

Heinemann HIV/AIDS teaching support site

Heinemann Publishers

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This site is a source of information and resources for children of both younger and older age groups. These books and resources are produced to support adults who are working in education, both inside and outside the classroom, to equip children to know and think about HIV and AIDS and how it affects people. There are fiction reviews, information books and curriculum material. Lower primary through to upper secondary levels are covered and aim to give children the knowledge, skills and values they need to tackle HIV and AIDS.
For younger children, there is a series of 3 books.
1. Go Away Dog by David Donald about a grumpy grandmother, a puppy and the importance of care and friendship in a time of sickness.
2. Respect and Care by Glynis Clacherty that looks at respect and care and co-operation amongst children as they confront sickness and loss.
3. Lerato’s Story by Glynis Clacherty which is a lively photo story about a young child who is HIV positive told through the eyes of her sister