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The Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning physical rehabilitation services

PRYOR, Wesley,
SMITH, Fleur
April 2017

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Ensuring quality and affordable rehabilitation services to anyone in need is at the heart of Handicap International mandate and strategy. The organisation is implementing physical rehabilitation projects in 40 countries,  The Rehabilitation Management System was initially developed to allow for more effective and reliable analysis of the quality of rehabilitation services in low resource countries. It draws on international standards, consensus and evidence and it is made of a set of scorecards that are used to monitor key components of management and support service planning. The initial instrument went through several participatory revisions and has been now implemented by Handicap International partners for about 6 years. While it covers domains that are specific to rehabilitation services, it is aligned to the broader health system strengthening framework. It is currently used in around 14 physical rehabilitation centers in 8 countries where settings and governance systems considerably vary, reflecting the different stages of development of physical rehabilitation services worldwide.

The “Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning Physical Rehabilitation services” guide follows the revision of the RMS scorecards, as a response to the demand from partner organisations, programmes and the Handicap International’s Rehabilitation Technical Unit for a greater adaptability of the system. It is hoped that this guide will further assist partners and programmes in implementing the RMS in effective and strategic management of their services in order to provide the highest quality care in the most sustainable manner.

Accessibility Guide Improving public transport services through awareness of staff about persons with disabilities and persons with reduced mobility

EUROPEAN DISABILITY FORUM
December 2016

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Presentation

To mark the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (3 December), the International Association of Public Transport (UITP), IRU (World's Road Transport organisation) and EDF jointly publish an 'Accessibility Guide' to improve customer service for persons with disabilities and persons with reduced mobility.

The publication aims to show that service quality and inclusiveness are of paramount importance for the public transport sector.

The guide is one of the initiatives that we are undertaking to raise awareness amongst staff about the barriers still existing to a fully inclusive public transport system and how to best overcome them. It is targeted at public transport staff regularly interacting with passengers and can be used in the context of disability awareness trainings.

About the guide:

Gunta Anca, EDF Vice-President: “With this accessibility guide we want to give simple tips and advice on how to improve service for persons with disabilities. There is really nothing to be afraid of – we are passengers like everyone else, just sometimes we need a little bit more of your support and understanding.”

Thomas Avanzata, Director of the European Department at UITP: “An average person does not know much about persons with disabilities. With this guide, we hope to close the knowledge gap for our bus drivers and be able to offer an improved service to persons with disabilities. We are very happy about the cooperation with EDF and IRU and optimistic that such small initiatives can make a difference on the ground, especially at times where financial resources for costly infrastructure works are scarce.”

Rémi Lebeda, who leads IRU’s work on passenger transport in Europe: “This accessibility guide is an excellent tool to improve the quality of service offered to people with disabilities by drivers and operators. We thank EDF and UITP for their excellent cooperation in working on this important issue. In further recognition of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities the guide will also be available in accessible format.”

Achieving professional integration of young people with disabilities - Collection of good practices and shared experiences in Casablanca, Morocco

TORRECILLA, Audrey
November 2016

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This publication aims to analyze and disseminate good practices implemented throughout the project called "Improving access to employment for Young people with disabilities in the Greater Casablanca. " To assess the success of this project, it was needed to meet the people with disabilities that benefited from work placement in the companies. The following testimonies come from smiling, dynamic people who, thanks to a stable employment, are able to project into the future.Their disability has become "a detail": for their Colleagues, they are Anouar, Zineb, Mustafa, Anas, Yasmine ... competent staff who as everyone in the company brings an added value. Rabii And Sanaa, who both work as inclusion agents at the AMH Group and in the association called ANAÏS, contributed greatly to these personal and professional achievements. Every day they accompany, advise, facilitate training, prepare disabled young people for the labor market, but they also approach companies and propose nominations. The career paths exposed in this publication are encouraging towards continuing their efforts, along with ANAPEC and the other players at stake in the inclusion sector: not only professional, but also every Moroccan companies and the CGEM, to allow Young people with disabilities to access to stable and rewarding work places. As for the companies, the results speak for themselves: trained human resources departments, formalized action plans to implement disability policies, CSR targets achieved, and skilled employees providing added value to the teams.

Best Practice Guides for professionals supporting autistic students in Higher Education. Guide 3: For professionals supporting autistic students within or outside HE Institutions

FABRI, Marc,
ANDREWS, Penny,
PUKI, Heta
March 2016

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This guide is for specialists directly supporting autistic students. This may be as part of a disability support team within a Higher Education Institution (HEI), or for an independent organisation that provides services to HE. Insights from research and from good practice across Europe are shared to help improve student experiences and engagement with information and services, and to develop expertise.

Best Practice Guides for professional supporting autistic students in Higher education. Guide 1: Best practice for HEI managers and senior academics

FABRI, Marc,
ANDREWS, Penny,
PUKKI, Heta
March 2016

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This guide is for managers and senior academics at universities and higher education institutions, to provide with information and evidence to help develop policies and practices that will benefit autistic students and improve the student experience. It was developed from work in five European countries. It is one of three guides to help higher education professionals support autistic students.

Disability and development GSDRC professional development

COBLEY, David
October 2015

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The reading pack highlights the importance of mainstreaming disability as a cross-cutting issue. Progress has been made since the post-2015 development framework especially in the legislation and in politics. However, in order to go further, “society itself needs to be radically reshaped (…) By mainstreaming disability into all areas of development assistance, general poverty and exclusion issues can be addressed in a way that does not leave out disabled people”

 

Disability and Development. GSDRC Professional Development Reading Pack no. 23

mhGAP Humanitarian Intervention Guide (mhGAP-HIG) Clinical Management of Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Conditions in Humanitarian Emergencies

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2015

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"The mhGAP Humanitarian Intervention Guide contains first-line management recommendations for mental, neurological and substance use conditions for non-specialist health-care providers in humanitarian emergencies where access to specialists and treatment options is limited. It is a simple, practical tool that aims to support general health facilities in areas affected by humanitarian emergencies in assessing and managing acute stress, grief, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, psychosis, epilepsy, intellectual disability, harmful substance use and risk of suicide....This new tool is an adaptation of WHO’s mhGAP Intervention Guide, a widely-used evidence-based manual for the management of these conditions in non-specialized health settings."

Online resource for parents and carers of children with autism

SIVARAMAKRISHNAN, Shobha
March 2015

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An information resource for the parents, carers and any other health professionals involved in the welfare of children on the autism spectrum. Within this document, it is outlined what is meant by the term 'autism', possible signs to look for in assessing and diagnosing a condition on the spectrum, associated physical or mental impairments which can be associated with a condition on the spectrum, and finally how a healthcare or other relevant professional (eg. education) may be best able to manage the condition in a variety of conditions

Note: The user has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Minimum standards for age and disability inclusion in humanitarian action : pilot version

AGE AND DISABILITY CONSORTIUM
2015

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This pilot version of the Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action has “been developed for use by all practitioners involved in humanitarian response, including staff and volunteers of local, national, and international humanitarian agencies, with the expectation that the inclusion of people with disabilities and older people is feasible at every stage of the response and in every sector and context. The Standards are intended to inform the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of humanitarian programmes; to strengthen accountability to people with disabilities and older people; and to support advocacy, capacity-building and preparedness measures on age and disability across the humanitarian system

 

The Standards are drawn from a wide-ranging review of existing guidance and standards developed by humanitarian actors over recent years. This includes material from organisations with a special focus on disability and/or older age, together with key documents, including the Sphere Handbook, the Sphere Companion Standards and the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS). The Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion do not create entirely new demands on humanitarian actors; rather, they clarify and reinforce what is already required if broader standards of impartial humanitarian programming and the principles of the Humanitarian Charter are to be upheld”

Forging new collaborations : a guide for rape crisis, domestic violence, and disability organizations

SMITH, Nancy,
HARRELL, Sandra
April 2011

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"This report is based upon Vera’s work with and observations of those collaborations from 2006 through 2010, as well as in-depth interviews with representatives from 10 of the groups and an extensive literature review on effective collaboration. It is designed for policy makers, practitioners, and first-responders interested in using collaboration to address violence against people with disabilities. It offers concrete recommendations for how to build effective collaboration between victim services and disability organizations, practical strategies for overcoming common obstacles, and steps to begin the collaboration process"
Note: Available in both pdf and word format

Increasing access to health workers in remote and rural areas through improved retention|Global policy recommendations

DOLEA, Carmen
et al
2010

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These guidelines aim to help national policy makers address the challenge of ensuring there are sufficient numbers of qualified health workers in remote and rural areas to be able to deliver effective health services and improve health outcomes. The guidelines outline the principles for creating national policy; evidence-based recommendations to improve the attraction, recruitment and retention of health workers to remote and rural areas; and measuring and evaluating the impact of rural retention policies

Embracing diversity : toolkit for creating inclusive, learning-friendly environments

SHAEFFER, Sheldon
et al
2009

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This updated toolkit consists of 10 booklets each containing tools and activities for self-study to start creating an inclusive, learning-friendly environment (ILFE). Some activities ask readers to reflect on what their school is doing now in terms of creating on ILFE, others guide readers in improving their skills as teachers in diverse classrooms.
The toolkit includes three specialist booklets focusing on including learners with disabilities, positive discipline, and teaching large classes.
The toolkit aims to assist teachers to acknowledge the diverse range of backgrounds amongst students and to build on the strengths of the children. It can be adjusted to the specific needs of each school, classroom and child and should not be read as a 'recipe book'.
The booklets are easy to read and contain tables, illustrations, checklists and examples to illustrate the application of inclusive schools.
Specialized booklet 1: Positive discipline in the inclusive, learning-friendly classroom : a guide for teachers and teacher educators
Specialized booklet 2: Practical tips for teaching large classes: a teacher's guide
Specialized booklet 3: Teaching children with disabilities in inclusive settings
Inrtoduction
Booklet 1: Becoming an inclusive, learning-friendly environment (ILFE)
Booklet 2: Working with families and communities to create an ILFE
Booklet 3: Getting all children in school and learning
Booklet 4: Creating inclusive, learning-friendly classrooms
Booklet 5: Managing inclusive, learning-friendly classrooms
Booklet 6: Creating a healthy and protective ILFE

Resource pack on systematization of experiences

HARGREAVES, Samantha,
MORGAN, Mariluz
Eds
2009

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Systematization of experiences is a methodology that helps people involved in different kinds of practice to organize and communicate what they have learned. Over the past 40 years systematization has evolved and obtained recognition as a methodology for social reflection, in Latin America. This resource pack provides materials for the English speaking world

Monitoring vital events resource kit : stepping stones for strengthening vital statistics systems

HEALTH METRICS NETWORK
2007

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This resource kit is intended to aid national agencies, development partners and technical experts to strengthen the monitoring of vital events by providing easy, user-friendly access to technical documents relating to civil registration, cause of death attribution, sentinel and sample registration with verbal autopsy, and demographic surveillance. Timely and reliable information on vital events is useful for governance and a basic underpinning of public health, yet in most developing countries, monitoring of these events is limited: births and deaths go unregistered and causes of death patterns remain poorly understood. The kit is available as a CD-ROM or online

HIV and AIDS and its treatment. Information pack : what you should know

KENYA AIDS NGOS CONSORTIUM (KANCO)
2006

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This accessible guide on HIV and AIDS covers all relevant aspects of the disease in simple and straightforward language. Contains essential information on HIV treatment, anti-HIV medications, treatment regimen failure, treatment regimen change, treatment adherence, HIV and pregnancy, HIV prevention, alternative therapies, and nutrition and AIDS. This package is aimed at people living with HIV, and affected families, communities and community care givers

Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) information kit

AIDS RESOURCE CENTRE
2005

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This infopack includes five inserts, which provide background information on antiretroviral therapy (what it is, challenges to implementing safe and effective antiretroviral programmes); antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Ethiopia, including details of where ART is available and eligibility for treatment; general health indicators for Ethiopia, including demography and health service statistics; a statement on the impact of HIV and AIDS in Ethiopia, from societal to community and individual level; and a glossary of words related to HIV and AIDS treatment

A parrot on your shoulder : a guide for people starting to work with orphans and vulnerable children

INTERNATIONAL HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
2004

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This book is designed to help people who work with children initiate meaningful dialogue and engage them in a cheerful and positive manner. It considers issues around encouraging children’s participation, why it is important, and what to include when planning children’s participation. It discusses issues of safety in accordance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and why, how and when to use games. It contains activities and ideas on how to include children in participatory processes

The elective pack : the medical student's guide to essential international health and development

HOPE, Rebecca
2004

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This pack is aimed at medical students travelling to developing countries on their elective but can also be helpful to anyone interested in global health issues. It introduces the actors, issues and processes in international health in an informative and understandable way. Chapters provide brief overviews of challenging issues such as communicable diseases, HIV/AIDS, essential medicines, nutrition and water and conflict and health

Working positively : a guide for NGOs managing HIV/AIDS in the workplace

UK CONSORTIUM ON AIDS AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
December 2003

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With HIV prevalence rates of over 20% in many sub-Saharan African countries, and with infection rates rising rapidly in other parts of the world, NGOs are funding that HIV/AIDS is affecting not only programme work but also staff. If NGOs are to be credible in these communities, they need to be seen to be addressing HIV/AIDS internally in a way that is consistent with their external messages. However, developing a workable comprehensive solution that covers policy, education and prevention, and treatment and care is not easy. This guide looks at the key issues involved in developing a workplace strategy and how different NGOs and commercial organisations are approaching these issues through a series of case studies. It also provides a guide to the key components of a successful strategy and a list of useful reference documents

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